Skip Navigation
Online help

Adding and working with objects in a document

Best practices: Designing effective documents
Best practices: Designing documents for Excel
Defining the display mode in which a document opens
Defining which display modes are available to users
Working with documents in Editable Mode
Graph types supported in Flash Mode

Hiding the floating grid toolbars in Flash Mode
Adding and deleting datasets
Adding and editing text and data

   - Adding static text
   - Adding dynamic text: Data fields
   - Adding dynamic text: Auto text codes
   - Adding the current date and time to a document
   - Adding a combination of static and dynamic text
Adding shapes: Lines and rectangles

Adding images
Adding Grid/Graphs
   - Adding a dataset to a Grid/Graph placeholder
   - Adding report objects to a Grid/Graph
   - Defining the properties of a Grid/Graph
   - Resizing a Grid/Graph

   - Enabling Quick Switch for Grid/Graphs
Layering data on dashboards: Adding panel stacks and panels
   - Adding a panel stack to a document
   - Adding panels to a panel stack
   - Deleting panels from a panel stack
   - Defining the current panel in a panel stack
   - Renaming panels
   - Reordering panels in a panel stack
Providing interactivity to users: Adding selectors
   - Defining a selector
   - Methods to create a selector
   - Adding a selector to a document
   - Creating a selector for a panel stack
   - Creating a selector for an attribute on a Grid/Graph
   - Creating a selector for an attribute in the Dataset Objects
   - Creating a selector for a metric on a Grid/Graph
   - Creating an interactive, Flash-only, selector
   - Selecting targets interactively
   - Controlling how data updates in a selector
   - Turning the All option off for items in a selector
   - Renaming the All option of a selector
   - Allowing a selector to control other selectors
Enabling a Grid/Graph to control another Grid/Graph: Using Grid/Graphs as selectors
Providing Flash-based interactivity and analysis to users: Adding and defining widgets
   - Understanding and working with widgets
   - Data requirements for widgets: Quick Reference Table
   - Defining a Gauge widget
   - Defining a Cylinder widget
   - Defining a Thermometer widget
   - Defining a Time Series Slider widget
   - Defining an Interactive Bubble Graph widget
   - Enabling drilling in an Interactive Bubble Graph widget
   - Defining an Interactive Stacked Graph widget
   - Defining a Heat Map widget
   - Creating a dynamic Heat Map
   - Turning a Grid/Graph into a widget
   - Determining how a widget is rendered in non-Flash modes
Viewing data related to a widget: Using widgets as selectors
   - Using a Time Series Slider widget as a selector
   - Using an Interactive Bubble Graph widget as a selector
   - 
Using an Interactive Stacked Graph widget as a selector
   - Using a Heat Map widget as a selector
Manipulating controls
   - Selecting controls
   - Selecting multiple controls
   - Adding multiple controls
   - Aligning controls
   - Distributing controls
   - Moving controls
   - Ordering controls
   - Sizing controls
   - Snapping controls to grids
Retrieving diagnostic information in Flash Mode for Technical Support

Best practices: Designing effective documents
Follow the best practices below to help you design an attractive and practical Report Services document.

  • Before you create the finished document, use Microsoft Excel, Paint, PowerPoint, or another tool to create a mock-up of the document you intend to design. Send the mockup to your user community to gather their feedback on its usefulness. This can save you valuable time creating a complex, finished document that may have to be redone.
  • Hide unused document sections (by collapsing the section on the document) so that the document is easier to work with. See Hiding and displaying sections.
  • Use the grouping feature to minimize the amount of data passed between the Web server and the Web browser. This is useful because documents do not use incremental fetch to return data from the server. See Grouping records in a document.
  • Determine whether the dataset(s) will return a large amount of data. If so, consider adding grouping to the document, by choosing which attributes to group the pages by. See Grouping records in a document.
  • Make the following decisions as you are planning the design of your document, not after you are finished:
  • If the document will be viewed in PDF, be sure to include bookmarks. See Including bookmarks in PDFs.
  • Do not include so many graphical objects that the data becomes unimportant. Make sure the data is the main focus of the document. The overall goal is to achieve a clean look.
  • Plan your design so that all related data can be seen on a single screen or page, and that it can be interpreted from the top left to the bottom right.
  • Save your document frequently as you design and format it.

For additional best practices when designing a dashboard and when using effects and widgets, see Best practices: Designing dashboard documents.

Best practices: Designing documents for Excel
Because Microsoft Excel and MicroStrategy Report Services documents often handle objects, formatting, and graph types in different ways, at times, it is necessary to adjust the way you design a document so that it is displayed correctly when exported to Excel.

When designing a document that may be exported to Excel, do the following to ensure that the document is displayed correctly in Microsoft Excel.

  • Choose Excel-compatible colors for all objects, including panels, shapes, grids, and graphs. To ensure that the colors you use are displayed correctly in Excel, use the set of 40 colors that appear in Web's Advanced Color Picker dialog or Formatting toolbar. These 40 colors are the ones that Excel supports, although Excel 2007 supports many more. Additional colors, from the Advanced Color Picker dialog box in Web, are matched by Microsoft Excel as closely as possible.
  • Use graph styles that are supported by Microsoft Excel. For example, if you include a Gauge graph in the document, it is not displayed in Excel. If you include a Combination graph, the exported version in Excel may not be displayed exactly like the original graph in Web.
  • Avoid overlapping objects. When exporting documents with objects that are overlapped, the document may not be displayed correctly. For example, an object in the background of the document may be displayed in the foreground of the Excel spreadsheet.
  • Provide extra space around objects because they may increase in size when the document is exported to Excel.
  • Instead of using lines and rectangles, use text field borders to create line and rectangles. Standard line and rectangle controls may not be displayed correctly in Excel.
  • Avoid inserting line breaks within text fields. Line breaks (inserted by typing Ctrl+Enter) are not rendered in Excel.
  • Do not enable word-wrapping in a grid header if the grid header contains more than one word. If you do so, the grid headers are not displayed correctly in Excel or PDF.
  • When you place an image in the document, use an absolute file path to define the location of the image. Do not use a relative file path. Images in documents specified with paths relative to MicroStrategy Web and Intelligence Server are not displayed when exported to Excel.

Defining the display mode in which a document opens
A document can be opened in one of several different display modes in which you can work with documents, including Editable, Interactive, View, and Flash Mode. See Choosing a display mode: Design, Editable, Flash, Interactive, and View for a comparison of the different views. You can determine the display mode in which a document opens by default.

You can also determine which display modes a user can choose from once that user has opened the document. For steps, see Determining which display modes are available to users.

To define whether a document opens in Editable, Interactive, View, or Flash Mode by default:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. From the Format menu, click Document Properties. The Document Properties dialog box opens.
  3. Select the Other tab.
  4. To define the display mode in which the document should initially open, select the option button in the Default column for that display mode.
  5. Click OK to apply the change and return to the document.

Defining which display modes are available to users
A document can be opened in one of several different display modes in which you can work with documents, including Editable, Interactive, View, and Flash Mode. See Choosing a display mode: Design, Editable, Flash, Interactive, and View for a comparison of the different modes. As the document designer, you can select the modes that are available for a specific document by enabling each you want to make available for users of the document.

To enable Flash Mode, a project administrator must ensure that Flash Mode is enabled in the project, as described in the Web Administrator project defaults help. An individual document designer or analyst can also disable Flash Mode on his machine if he knows that Flash is not installed or does not want to use Flash. For these steps, see Enabling and disabling Flash Mode.

You can also define which mode the document should initially open in, as explained in Determining the display mode in which a document opens.

To determine which display modes a user can choose to work in, for a document:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. From the Format menu, click Document Properties. The Document Properties dialog box is displayed.
  3. Select the Other tab.
  4. To make a mode available in the document, select the option button in the Available column for that display mode. For example, if you want to ensure that Editable Mode and Interactive Mode are the only display modes available in the document, select those option buttons in the Available column. Then, clear the option buttons for any display modes you do not want users to have access to.
  5. Click OK to apply the change and return to the document. The next time the document is executed, only the display modes you selected are available in the View menu or on the Standard toolbar.

Working with documents in Editable Mode
Editable Mode is a Web mode that most document designers will work in frequently. It is the mode that provides the most powerful set of functionality. It allows a document designer to add datasets to a document, format the look and feel of the entire document, insert controls such as panel stacks, text fields, and widgets, and also manipulate the data in the reports in several ways.

Editable Mode provides nearly the same functionality as Design Mode, with a few exceptions. The main difference between Editable and Design Mode is that Design Mode does not display the actual results of any reports in the document. Therefore, performance-wise, Design Mode loads and works more quickly than Editable Mode. The other small differences between Design Mode and Editable Mode include the following:

  • Design Mode displays the structure of the document, or the placeholders for the document components, without the actual results. Editable Mode displays the results.
  • In Design Mode, you can modify and format the placeholders, but you cannot format Grid/Graphs. To format Grid/Graphs, you must switch to Editable Mode.
  • You can perform the following tasks in Editable Mode only, but not in Design Mode:
    • Formatting Grid/Graphs, including the formatting of metric values and attribute headers
    • Using Page-by to group data
    • Sorting data in grid reports
    • Showing or hiding rulers

Warning

Performance in Web may fluctuate, depending on several factors, including the number of users working at the same time in the system, your client machine, and issues with network bandwidth.

Prerequisites

To work in Editable Mode, you must have the necessary document designer privileges and Editable Mode must be enabled in the document you are viewing. If Editable Mode is not displayed in the View menu, contact your administrator because you may not have the correct privileges and/or Editable Mode may not be enabled for the particular document you are viewing.

To switch to Editable Mode:

While viewing a document, from the View menu, select Editable Mode.

Note: If Editable Mode is not displayed in the View menu, contact your administrator because Editable Mode may not be enabled for the particular document you are viewing.

Graph types supported in Flash Mode
Most graph types available for reports are displayed in Flash Mode. However, some graph types are not supported in Flash Mode. If an unsupported graph type is viewed in Flash Mode, an error is displayed and it is not displayed. In such cases, you or the document designer must open the document in Editable Mode to change the graph type of the report to a supported type.

The following graph types are the only graph types supported in Flash Mode:

  • Vertical Bar:
    • Clustered
    • Absolute
    • Percent
    • Stacked
    • Clustered Dual-axis

  • Horizontal Bar:
    • Clustered
    • Absolute
    • Percent
    • Stacked
    • Clustered Dual-axis

  • Vertical Line:
    • Absolute
    • Dual-axis Absolute

  • Horizontal Line:
    • Absolute
    • Dual-axis Absolute

  • Vertical Area:
    • Absolute
    • Percent
    • Stacked

  • Horizontal Area:
    • Absolute

  • Pie:
    • Pie
    • Ring Pie

    Note: Pie graphs may appear slightly larger in Flash Mode than they do in other display modes.

  • Stock:
    • Hi-Low-Open-Close

  • Scatter:
    • X-Y Scatter
    • X-Y Scatter Dual-axis

  • Bubble:
    • Bubble
  • Note: The minimum, maximum, and interval settings for the Bubble graph may not be displayed in Flash Mode exactly as it does in other display modes.

  • Combination graphs that use a combination of only two types of graph (of the graph types listed above). All other combination graphs are not supported.
    Note: The alignment of the Y-axis labels may appear differently in Flash Mode than they do in other display modes.
  • Nested labels in graphs are not displayed in Flash Mode. If the graph currently uses nested labels, switch to another label type before opening the graph in Flash Mode.

  • If a graph legend is positioned manually rather than automatically, the graph legend may not be displayed in exactly the same position in Flash Mode.

Hiding the floating grid toolbars in Flash Mode
When you hover the cursor over the columns of a grid report in Flash Mode, a floating toolbar is displayed. The toolbar allows you to either sort or pivot a column of data. However, you can ensure that these toolbars are never displayed.

To hide the floating grid toolbars in Flash Mode:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. From the Format menu, select Document Properties. The Document Properties dialog box opens.
  3. Select the Other tab.
  4. Clear the Show floating grid toolbars in Flash check box.
  5. Click OK to apply the changes.

Adding and deleting datasets
Datasets provide the data that appears in documents. Datasets are MicroStrategy reports that define which information the Intelligence Server should retrieve from the data source or cache. This information can include attributes, custom groups, consolidations, and metrics.

When you create a document, you must select at least one dataset for your document. The number of rows in the dataset determines the number of times the Detail section is repeated. That is, anything in the Detail section is repeated once per row in the dataset.

You can also add a dataset and use it to populate an empty Grid/Graph in one step. For more information and a procedure, see Adding a dataset to a Grid/Graph placeholder.

Note: Grid/Graphs cannot be placed in the Detail section, because the Grid/Graph would be repeated on each row.

Prerequisites

You must have the necessary document designer privileges to add a dataset to a report.

To add a dataset report to a document:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. To add the dataset, do one of the following:
    • From the Data menu, select Add Dataset. The Select Dataset dialog box opens. Select the dataset report from the drop-down list or use the Find button to locate it.
    • Click a Grid/Graph or widget already in the document. The Add Dataset icon is displayed at the top of the Grid/Graph or widget. Click the Add Dataset icon. The Select Dataset dialog box opens.

      Note: If you have OLAP Services, be aware that the Dataset Objects panel contains all of the objects from the dataset report, regardless of whether they are displayed on the report. For example, even if a metric is in the Report Objects but not displayed on the grid, that metric is still listed as a Dataset Object.
  3. Select the report to use as a dataset for the document.
  4. If you are modifying a Grid/Graph or widget already in the document, you can determine if formatting from the dataset report is applied when the dataset is placed in the document. To do so, select the Add with formatting check box.
  5. Click OK. You are returned to the Document Editor, with the selected report added to Dataset Objects.
  6. Repeat steps 1-5 for each dataset you wish to include in the document.
  7. To place the dataset on the document, drag the dataset from the Dataset Objects and place it in the desired location on the document.
    • To ensure that the formatting from the dataset report is applied when the dataset is placed in the document, hold SHIFT while dragging the dataset over to the document.

To delete a dataset:

    1. Right-click the dataset in the Dataset Objects panel and select Delete from Document. The dataset with all its objects is removed from the document.

    OR

    1. Click the dataset name in the Dataset Objects area.
    2. Click the Remove Dataset icon  at the top of the Dataset Objects area. The dataset with all its objects is removed from the document.

Adding and editing text and data
Text and data are displayed in documents through text fields, which is a type of control. Text fields can contain metrics or attributes from a dataset, page numbers, or descriptive labels. There are three types of text that you can use for text fields. Click the following links for instructions on how to add text and data into the text fields:

  • static text: which does not change and serves as a label. When you view the document as a PDF, it displays just as it is typed and formatted in the text field when the document is in Design Mode.
  • dynamic text, which is populated by the document or dataset. Dynamic text is always found within braces, that is, { }. There are two types of dynamic text:
    • data fields: are populated from a dataset with data that originated in the data warehouse or an Intelligence Server cache. A data field is only a reference to an object on a report.
    • auto text codes : are populated by the document or dataset and consist of the document's or dataset's properties rather than data from the data warehouse. It includes information such as the document's name, page number, execution time, and so on. Auto text codes can be considered as a type of variable. For the full list of available codes, see Adding dynamic text - auto text codes.
  • a combination of any or all of the types in one text field.

To edit text fields:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Double-click a text field, or select the text field and press F2.
  3. Make your changes by doing the following:
    • typing new text
    • adding a data field by dragging and dropping a Dataset Object into the selected text field
    • adding an auto text code by selecting the code from Auto Text from the Insert menu or typing the code into the text field
  1. To begin on another line, press Enter.
  2. To exit editing, click anywhere outside the text field.

Note: When you rename a template unit such as a metric, any text fields that reference that metric are not automatically updated with the new name. For example, suppose the dataset report on your document contains a metric called "Revenue". You create a text field by dragging and dropping the Revenue metric from the Report Objects list to the document. If you change the name of the Revenue metric to "Total Revenue," the text field you created still reads "Revenue." The text field is not updated with the new name ("Total Revenue") you assigned the metric.

Adding static text
Static text does not change and serves as a label. When document is printed out as a PDF, static text displays just as it is typed and formatted in the text field when the document is in Design or View Mode. Any text in a text field prints as it exists in the field unless it is within brackets (that is, { }), which the document recognizes as an auto text code or as data from Dataset Objects.

To add static text to a document:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. From the Insert menu, select Text.
    OR
    Click the Text icon  on the Controls toolbar. When you move the mouse to the Layout area, the pointer becomes crosshairs.
  3. Click in the desired section of the Layout area. If you click and drag in the section, you can size the text field.
  4. Type the static text, which can serve as a label in the document.
    OR
    Right-click an object in Dataset Objects and select Add to Section as Static Text.
  5. Press Enter when you finish adding the text.
  6. The text field is automatically formatted in a default style using the control defaults.
  7. You can change the formatting of the text field by using the following:
    • Formatting toolbar: Provides easy access to basic formatting options such as font, border, and colors.
    • Format dialog box: To access this dialog box, right-click the text field and select Format Control. The dialog box provides more advanced font, alignment, number format, border, and color options, including gradient colors, 3D borders, and drop shadows.
    • Properties dialog box: To access this dialog box, right-click the text field and select Properties. The dialog box provides general and layout properties, such as name, position, and size, that define the text field.
    • Right-click options: for basic border, fill color, and font color properties.
  8. You can manipulate the text field in a number of ways, as described in Manipulating controls.
Adding dynamic text: Data fields
Data fields are one type of dynamic text and are references to objects on a dataset (a report in a document). Data fields are populated from a dataset with data that originated in the data source (or an Intelligence Server cache). The text must be typed within braces (that is, { }) and must match either the name of an object in a dataset or its alias. Data fields can be
  • Attributes
  • Consolidations
  • Custom groups
  • Metrics

When the document is displayed in PDF or in View Mode, data fields are replaced by the actual data. If the object referenced by one data field is removed from the dataset report, the data field becomes static text in the PDF.

To add a data field to a document:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Do one of the following:
    • Add a dataset object from Dataset objects.
      • Select the object to add to the document from the objects displayed in Dataset Objects.
      • Drag and drop the selected object into the Layout area.
    • Insert a blank text field and type the object's name within braces.
      • Select Text from the Insert menu or click the Text icon  in the Controls toolbar. When you move the mouse to the Layout area, the pointer becomes crosshairs.
      • Click in the desired section of the Layout area. If you click and drag in the section, you can size the text field.
      • Type the object's name within braces (that is, { }). If the object exists in multiple datasets, use the format {[dataset name]}:{[object name]}. If the name has spaces or special characters, type it in brackets (that is, [ ]) within the braces.
        Note: A special character is any character other than a z, A Z, 0 9, #, _, and . (period).
      • Press Enter when you have finished. The text field is automatically formatted in a default style using the control defaults.

        Note: You can change the format of the text by using the toolbar options, such as Font, Size, Bold, Italic, Underline , and so on.

      Note: Each text field is automatically placed within square brackets [ ] when you drop it in the Layout area. After you save and reopen the document, the brackets remain only if the object name contains special characters. A special character is any character other than a - z, A - Z, 0 - 9, #, _, and . (period). This ensures that data fields are resolved correctly when the PDF is displayed in a language other than English.

  3. You can change the formatting of the text field by using the following:
    • Formatting toolbar: Provides easy access to basic formatting options such as font, border, and colors.
    • Format Control dialog box: To access this dialog box, right-click the data field and select Format Control. The dialog box provides more advanced font, alignment, number format, border, and color options, including gradient colors, 3D borders, and drop shadows.
    • Properties dialog box: To access this dialog box, right-click the data field and select Properties. The dialog box provides general and layout properties, such as name, position, and size, that define the data field.
    • Right-click options: for basic border, fill color, and font color properties.
  4. You can manipulate the data field in a number of ways, as described in Manipulating controls.

Adding dynamic text: Auto text codes
Auto text codes are document or dataset variable information. They are a type of dynamic text that is populated by the document or dataset but consists of the document's or dataset's properties rather than data from the data warehouse or cache. Examples are the document's name, page number, execution time, and so on.

The following auto text codes allow you to add document variable information to your document:

Page number { &PAGE }  Current page number
Total number of pages    { &NPAGES }Total number of pages in the document or in the group's section
Date & Time { &DATETIME }Current date and time of the client machine when the PDF was generated
Current user { &USER }Full name, not Desktop login, of the user who generates the PDF
Document name{ &DOCUMENT }   Name of the document as stored in the project
Project name { &PROJECT }Name of the project in which the document is stored
Prompts { &PROMPT1& }
{ &PROMPT2& }

{ &PROMPTn& }

User's answers to the prompts in the report, where n is the number of the prompt in order; that is, {&PROMPT1&} returns the answer
to the first prompt, {&PROMPT2&} returns the answer to the second prompt, and so on; applies to object prompts and attribute qualification prompts only

Note: If n is greater than the number of prompts in the document, the code cannot be replaced with pertinent information. Therefore, the code itself is displayed in the PDF.

Document execution time { &EXECUTIONTIME } Date and time the document was executed

Note: The auto text codes for Date & Time and Document execution time can be formatted using the Number formatting setting (select Control from the Format menu). For example, you can display only the date without the time, or you can print the month name rather than the number, and so on.

The following auto text codes allow you to add dataset information to your document.

For all these codes, replace REPORTNAME with the name of the related dataset report. If it contains any spaces or special characters (anything other than a-z, A-z, #, _, . (period), and 0-9), type the name within square brackets, that is, [ ]. For example, for a report named Sales Forecast, type {&[Sales Forecast]:}.

  • Report filter details: {&REPORTNAME:FILTERDETAILS}
    Displays the report filter and report limit used in the report; applies to attribute element list
    prompts, hierarchy qualification prompts, metric qualification prompts, and attribute
    qualification prompts only, as well as all filters and limits that do not contain
    prompts. If the dataset report has both a report filter and a view filter, they print with the word "and" between them. If the report does not have a filter, the text "Empty Filter" is printed.
    Note: If you do not specify the report's REPORTNAME, the filter information from the document's primary dataset is printed.


  • Prompt details: {&REPORTNAME:PROMPTDETAILS}
    Displays the prompt answers for the report; applies to metric qualification
    prompts, object prompts, and attribute qualification prompts only
    Note: This variable is useful if you do not know the exact order or number of prompts
    in the report.

  • Report execution time: {&REPORTNAME:EXECUTIONTIME}
    Displays the date and time the dataset report was executed.

To add an auto text code to a document:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Do one of the following:
    • Select Auto Text on the Insert menu and choose the code from the list. The text field is added at the top left corner of the selected section, although you can move it.
      • Page Number: current printed page number.
      • Total Pages: total number of printed pages.
      • Date/Time: current date/time on the client machine of the user requesting the output results.
      • Current User: name of the current user.
      • Document Name: name of the current document.
      • Project Name: name of the project to which the current document belongs.
      • Document Execution Time: the time at which the document finishes executing.
      • Filter Details: details of the filter in text.
    • Select Text from the Insert menu or click the Text icon  in the toolbar.
      • When you move the mouse to the Layout area, the pointer becomes crosshairs. Click in the desired section of the Layout area. If you click and drag in the section, you can size the text field. Type the auto text code. Remember to type the code within braces (that is, { }). For lists of the auto text codes, see the above table.
      • Press Enter when you have finished.
        Note: To add an auto text code to an existing text field, edit the text field (by selecting it and pressing F2) and then add the code. You may need to resize the text field to view the auto text code.
  1. You can change the formatting of the text field by using the following:
    • Formatting toolbar: Provides easy access to basic formatting options such as font, border, and colors.
    • Format Control dialog box: To access this dialog box, right-click the data field and select Format Control. The dialog box provides more advanced font, alignment, number format, border, and color options, including gradient colors, 3D borders, and drop shadows.
    • Properties dialog box: To access this dialog box, right-click the data field and select Properties. The dialog box provides general and layout properties, such as name, position, and size, that define the text field.
    • Right-click options: for basic border, fill color, and font color properties.
  2. You can manipulate the text field in a number of ways, as described in Manipulating controls.

Adding the current date and time to a document
Using auto text codes, you can add the current date and time to a text field within your document.

To add the current date and time to a document:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Expand the section where you want the date and time by clicking the plus sign next to the section name.
  3. Point to Auto Text on the Insert menu and select Date and Time. The text field is added at the top left corner of the selected section, although you can move it.
  4. You can change the formatting of the Date and Time field by using the following:
    • Formatting toolbar: Provides easy access to basic formatting options such as font, border, and colors.
    • Format Control dialog box: To access this dialog box, right-click the data field and select Format Control. The dialog box provides more advanced font, alignment, number format, border, and color options, including gradient colors, 3D borders, and drop shadows.
    • Properties dialog box: To access this dialog box, right-click the data field and select Properties. The dialog box provides general and layout properties, such as name, position, and size, that define the data field.
    • Right-click options: for basic border, fill color, and font color properties.

Adding a combination of static and dynamic text
You can combine any number of static text entries, data fields, and auto text codes in a single text field. The document renders any auto text codes and data fields according to the dataset and document details and combines it with the static text in the field.

For example, if you type Date/time: in a text field, you can insert the Date and Time auto text code into the same field. The document prints the result as: Date/time: 11/15/2007 07:15:00 PM

Note: When different types of text are combined in one text field, each type can have its own formatting and properties. For example, you can bold "Date/time:" but keep the actual date and time in plain text.

To combine static and dynamic text in one text field:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Add a text field of any type:
    • static text
    • a data field
    • an auto text code
  3. Edit the text field by selecting it and pressing F2.
  4. To begin on another line, press ENTER.
  5. Add more text of any type, as described below. The new data is added at the position of the text cursor.
    • To add static text, simply type the text.
    • To add a data field, drag and drop a dataset object into the selected text field.
    • To add an auto text code, select Auto Text from the Insert menu and choose the code, or type the code into the text field.
  6. You can change the formatting of the field by using the following:
    • Formatting toolbar: Provides easy access to basic formatting options such as font, border, and colors.
    • Format dialog box: To access this dialog box, right-click the data field and select Format Control. The dialog box provides more advanced font, alignment, number format, border, and color options, including gradient colors, 3D borders, and drop shadows.
    • Properties dialog box: To access this dialog box, right-click the data field and select Properties. The dialog box provides general and layout properties, such as name, position, and size, that define the data field.
    • Right-click options: for basic border, fill color, and font color properties.
  7. When you are finished editing and formatting the text, click anywhere outside the text field.

Adding shapes: Lines and rectangles
You can insert rectangles, rounded rectangles, horizontal lines, or vertical lines in a document from the Insert menu or the Controls toolbar.
You can use lines to separate different areas of sections. Rectangles provide color and can highlight or separate areas. You can apply borders to rounded rectangles, but the borders display only in Flash Mode.

To add a line:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Expand the section where you want the line by clicking the plus sign next to the section name.
  3. From the Insert menu, select Line or click the Line icon in the Controls toolbar. When you move the mouse to the Layout area, the pointer becomes crosshairs.
  4. Click in the desired section of the Layout area. Click and drag to size the line and draw either a vertical or horizontal line.
  5. You can change the formatting of the line by right-clicking it and selecting Properties.

You can insert either a rectangle (with square corners and a border) or a rounded rectangle (with rounded corners and no borders).

To add a rectangle:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Expand the section where you want the rectangle by clicking the plus sign next to the section name.
  3. Click the arrow next to the Rectangle icon in the Controls toolbar and select either Rectangle (for a rectangle with square corners) or Rounded Rectangle. When you move the mouse to the Layout area, the pointer becomes crosshairs.
  4. Click in the desired section of the Layout area. If you click and drag in the section, you can size the rectangle.
  5. You can change the formatting of the rectangle by right-clicking it and selecting Properties.

    Note: You can also use the toolbar to format the rectangle. However, the toolbar contains only a subset of the options contained in the Properties dialog box.

Adding images
You can insert any image, such as a logo, into a document. The image type must be in a .bmp, .jpg, .jpeg, or .gif format. The image must be available to both

  • the Intelligence Server
  • all users who design the document, so they can view the image while designing the document

To ensure access, the image files should be placed on a Web server machine that the Intelligence Server can access or on a shared drive that everyone can access.

To insert an image:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Select Image from the Insert menu or click the Image icon  on the Controls toolbar. When you move the mouse to the Layout area, the pointer becomes crosshairs.
  3. Click in the desired section of the Layout area. If you click and drag in the section, you can size the image. The Properties dialog box opens.
  4. On the Image tab, type in the path for the image file in the Source field.

    Notes: 
    • In general, you can type the file path in a "C:\My Images\logo.gif" format.
    • If the document will be opened in Flash Mode, do not use a network (i.e. \\boston-ghernandez\Shared\image.jpg) or local image path (i.e. C:\My images\image.jpg). Use only an HTTP-based image path. Images that use a non HTTP-based path are not displayed in Flash Mode.
    • If the document will be exported to Excel, do not use a relative image path. Use only an absolute image path. Images that use a relative image path are not displayed in Excel.
  5. To create a hyperlink for the image, click the General tab, select the Is hyperlink check box, and type in the URL information.

Adding Grid/Graphs
You can quickly add a report to a document by dragging it from the Dataset Objects panel and adding it to a document. However, you can also insert a Grid/Graph control in a document that can be used for a wider range of purposes. A Grid/Graph is a special type of control that acts as a standard MicroStrategy report in a document. To insert a Grid/Graph, from the Insert menu, select Grid.

You can use a Grid/Graph as a type of summary for a group or the entire document, because data displayed there is aggregated to the level in which the Grid/Graph is placed. For example, your document is grouped by Region and you place a Grid/Graph in the Region header. In the Northeast Region header, the Grid/Graph aggregates and displays data for just the Northeast.

Once a Grid/Graph is in a document, you can display it in several views. You can do this by selecting the desired icon on the Crosstab toolbar or by right-clicking the grid and selecting a View Mode in which to view the report.

  • Grid: displays the object as a standard MicroStrategy grid report with rows and columns of attributes and metrics.
  • Graph: displays the data visually as in a standard MicroStrategy graph report.
  • Grid and Graph: combines both Grid and Graph Views into one object.

You can also use a Grid/Graph to display a subset report, that is, a report with Report Objects that are not displayed on the grid. For more information, see Using a subset report as a dataset.

A Grid/Graph can be placed anywhere in a document except in the Detail section. Since controls in the Detail section are repeated once per row of the dataset, the Grid/Graph would be repeated on each row.

A Grid/Graph is directly associated with one dataset. You cannot mix data from multiple datasets within one Grid/Graph.

The following steps describe how to insert a Grid/Graph into a document.

To insert a Grid/Graph into a document:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Do one of the following:
    • To create an empty grid, click the Grid icon  on the Controls toolbar. Then click in the desired section and an empty grid is added to the section. If you click and drag, you can size the grid while creating it. Empty grids are not displayed in PDF view.
      Note: An empty Grid/Graph is a placeholder; you can populate it later with data from a dataset report. For more information, see Adding a dataset to a Grid/Graph placeholder.
    • To create a Grid/Graph with several Dataset Objects on it, select the objects in Dataset Objects, by using either SHIFT+click or CTRL+click. Drag and drop them in the desired section while pressing the SHIFT key. By default, metrics are placed in the columns and everything else in the rows.
    • To create a Grid/Graph using all the items in a dataset, drag and drop the dataset's name from Dataset Objects to the desired section. If you hold down the SHIFT key while adding the grid, the original layout formatting is retained and only those objects displayed on the grid (versus those in the Report Objects but not on the grid) are added to the Grid/Graph. For more information, please refer to Using a subset report as a dataset.
  3. The Grid/Graph is displayed as a grid by default. Its default view is Grid. To change the view to graph, click the Graph icon on the toolbar.

    Note: You can place a Grid/Graph anywhere in a document except in the Detail section. Since controls in the Detail section are repeated once per row of the dataset, the Grid/Graph would be repeated on each row.

Adding a dataset to a Grid/Graph placeholder
You can add a dataset report to a Grid/Graph placeholder (an empty Grid/Graph) by doing either of the following:

  • Adding a new dataset report and populating the Grid/Graph placeholder in one step
  • Dragging an existing dataset report to the Grid/Graph placeholder

The data on the selected dataset report (either new or existing) is used to populate the Grid/Graph placeholder. Instructions for each method follow.

This saves time, and also allows you to create a document template containing Grid/Graph placeholders but no dataset reports. You can then use the template to create several different documents, each with specific dataset reports and Grid/Graphs populated by those datasets.

The formatting of the Grid/Graph placeholder is retained when you add a dataset report to the placeholder. To continue with the template scenario above, all the Grid/Graphs could be formatted identically in the documents, regardless of the formatting on the dataset reports.

Note: To format a Grid/Graph placeholder, populate it with data, format it, and then remove the data. The formatting is retained on the placeholder. To format the rows and columns of a Grid/Graph, edit the Grid/Graph in Editable Mode or Interactive Mode.

You can also choose to copy the formatting from the dataset report. In the template scenario, each Grid/Graph could be formatted differently, depending on the formatting in the original datasets reports.

To add a dataset and a Grid/Graph simultaneously:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. If the document does not already contain an empty Grid/Graph (a Grid/Graph placeholder), do one of the following:
    • Click the Grid icon in the Controls toolbar or select Grid from the Insert menu. Click and drag in the section where you want the Grid/Graph.
    • Click the Add Dataset icon in the upper left corner of the Grid/Graph placeholder. The Select Dataset dialog box opens.
  3. Locate and select the dataset report to add to the document. This dataset report also provides the data for the Grid/Graph.
  4. By default, the Grid/Graph uses the formatting from the Grid/Graph placeholder. Alternatively, the formatting of the dataset report can be retained. To do this, select the Add with formatting check box.
  5. Click OK to return to the document. The Grid/Graph placeholder now contains data, and the dataset report is displayed in the Dataset Objects panel.

To add an existing dataset to a Grid/Graph placeholder:

  1. Open the document and view it in either Design Mode or Editable Mode from the View menu.
  2. If the document does not already contain an empty Grid/Graph (a Grid/Graph placeholder), do the following:
    • Click the Grid icon in the controls toolbar or select Grid from the Insert menu. Click and drag in the section where you want the Grid/Graph.
  3. Do one of the following:
    • To use the formatting of the Grid/Graph placeholder, drag and drop the name of the dataset report from Dataset Objects to the Grid/Graph placeholder.
    • To retain the formatting of the dataset report, hold down the SHIFT key while dragging and dropping the dataset’s name from Dataset Objects to the Grid/Graph placeholder.

Adding report objects to a Grid/Graph
You can add report objects such as attributes and metrics to a Grid/Graph by performing the following steps.

To add report objects to a Grid/Graph:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Select objects from the dataset from Dataset Objects and drag them to the desired positions on the grid.

    Note: You cannot combine objects from different datasets in the same Grid/Graph.

Defining the properties of a Grid/Graph
You can define and adjust the layout and overall appearance of Grid/Graphs in several ways, as described below.

To define the properties of a Grid/Graph:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Select the Grid/Graph for which to define the properties.
  3. Select Properties from the Format menu.
  4. Define the properties on the General, Layout, and Grid tabs.

    On the General tab, you can change the following properties:
    • Name: is used to identify the grid/graph.
    • Tooltip: Contains the pop-up text that is displayed when you or another user positions the cursor over this control.
    • Visible: determines whether the text field is visible when a user views the document. The control always remains visible in Design Mode, regardless of this setting.
    • Show title bar: Displays a title bar which helps to identify the object and provide a dashboard look to your documents.
      • Title: Displays in the title bar. If this field is left blank, the title of the report is used.
      • Display State: Determines how the window is initially displayed: at its normal size, minimized, or maximized.
     
    On the Layout tab, you can change the following properties:
    • Position:
      • Left: for the distance between the left edge of the grid/graph and the left border of the section.
      • Top: for the distance between the top edge of the grid/graph and the top of the section.
    • Size:
      • Width: for the width of the grid/graph .
      • Height: for the height of the grid/graph .
        For Width and Height, select one of the following options:
        • Fixed: the height does not change from the set size (for graph or grid/graph views)
        • Fit to contents: the height expands to the height of the contents of the grid/graph.
    • Grid:
      • View: Determine the mode in which the grid is displayed once the document is executed. You can select either Grid, Graph, or Grid and Graph view.
      • Grid Overflow (HTML): Determine the behavior of the grid if it overflows beyond the boundaries of the document. Select Scroll to provide a scroll bar to make it easy for analysts to view grid data that appears beyond a document's borders. This setting applies only if the document in View Mode is displayed in HTML, which is the default. A project administrator can specify a document's execution mode.
      • Grid Overflow (PDF & Excel): Determine the behavior of the grid if it overflows beyond the boundaries of the document. Select Scroll to provide a scroll bar to make it easy for analysts to view grid data that appears beyond a document's borders. This setting applies only if the document in View Mode is displayed in PDF or is exported to PDF or Excel. By default, documents in View Mode are displayed in HTML. A project administrator can specify a document's execution mode.
      • Quick switch: Determines whether a user can switch between viewing the grid or the graph by clicking a button in Editable, Interactive, or View Mode. This option is displayed only when View mode is set to Grid or to Graph. For more information, see Quick Switch for Grid/Graphs in documents.
      • Data source: Determine the report that is used to populate the selected grid.

 On the Grid tab (is only displayed for grid and grid/graph views), you can change the following properties:

    • Headers: for Rows and Columns, select from the following options:
      • Show
      • Merge
      • Lock
    • View:
      • Outline
      • Show banding
      • Show attribute form names
      • Show thresholds

Resizing a Grid/Graph
The following steps describe how to resize a Grid/Graph currently in your document.

To resize a Grid/Graph:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Click the Grid/Graph you want to resize. Colored sizing handles are displayed around it. 
  3. Do one of the following:
    • Drag any of the sizing handles. Drop to the grid/graph's new size.
    • Hold down the SHIFT key while pressing the Up, Down, Left, or Right arrow key.
      Note: If you hold down the SHIFT key while using the keyboard arrows, Snap to Grid is temporarily disabled.
    • Using the Properties dialog box (the Layout tab) to define the properties.
    • When you are done, click anywhere in the Layout area outside the Grid/Graph object.

Enabling Quick Switch for Grid/Graphs
As the document designer, you can determine if users can quickly switch between the grid view and graph view of a report in a document. For information about Quick Switch, see Quickly switching between a Grid and Graph view.

Prerequisites

The display mode of the Grid/Graph must be set to either Graph or to Grid before Quick Switch can be enabled. If View Mode is set to Grid and Graph, the Quick Switch property is not available.

To enable Quick Switch for a Grid/Graph:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Click the Grid/Graph to select it. Resizing handles are displayed around it.
  3. From the Format menu, select Properties. The Properties dialog box is displayed.
  4. Click the Layout tab.
  5. In the Grid area, select the Quick Switch check box. This ensures that a Quick Switch button appears at the top of the selected Grid/Graph and users can click it to quickly view the grid or graph version of a report.

Layering data on dashboards: Adding panel stacks and panels
Panel stacks allow you to provide document analysts with several different perspectives into data, without having to show them all at the same time. A panel stack consists of one or more panels, each of which
holds a specific set of data that provides a particular perspective for analysts. For example, you can stack two panels, each containing a different Grid/Graph. In Interactive Mode, users can flip between the panels, quickly replacing one Grid/Graph with the other. Use panels as a building block for interactive dashboards, which summarize key business indicators in easy-to-read interfaces.

To create panels, you must first insert a panel stack, which is a holder for a collection of panels, into the document. A panel stack can be placed anywhere in a document except in the Detail section. (Since controls in the Detail section are repeated once per row of the dataset, the panel stack would be repeated on each row.) A new panel stack already shows a single panel by default. Then, you can add panels to the panel stack.

You can add any control (text fields, Grid/Graphs, and so on), including a panel stack, to a panel. Adding a control to a panel is the same as adding it to another part of the document.

Note: Panel stacks in documents may look slightly different in one operating system than they do in another.

The current panel: What document analysts see in the document

Document analysts working in Interactive, View, or Flash Mode see only the borders and title bar of the panel stack; the actual content is provided by the current panel, that is, the panel displayed in Design Mode, Editable Mode, or when the document is first executed. You must add a selector, such as a radio button or drop-down list, to allow users to display the different panels of a panel stack. For steps to do this, see Creating a selector for a panel stack.

Note: In View Mode only, the current panel is displayed or printed; the user cannot change to a different panel.

Panel stack example

The image below provides an example of what a panel stack looks like in Editable Mode. In the image, the current panel contains a gauge graph report. It is a simple graph report named Gauge Revenue that consists of the Region attribute and the Revenue metric, as shown at the top of the Dataset Objects panel on the left. The panel consists of the report itself, a title, and a text field at the bottom that displays the total Revenue.

Since the panel stack is being viewed in Editable Mode, a panel stack floating toolbar is displayed above the panel when the panel is selected. From the toolbar, a document designer can move the entire panel stack, switch from one panel to the next to format or add objects to them, create new panels, delete panels, and re-order the panels.

Notice the selector that appears above the panel stack; the selector is also shown below.

This Button style selector lets analysts determine which panel is displayed in the document. When a document analyst clicks the Corporate button, the first panel (shown above) is displayed. When an analyst clicks the Regional button, the second panel in the panel stack is displayed (shown below). The first panel represents an overall corporate view of the data, while the second panel represents a more regional view of the data. It is strongly recommended to allow a document analyst to choose which panel to view at a time. For example, this allows the analyst interested in regional revenue to spend most of his time viewing and working with the Regional panel. To do this, you must create a selector from a panel stack. For information on creating a selector for a panel stack, see Creating a selector for a panel stack.

The image below depicts the second panel in the panel stack, which is behind the panel shown above. This panel consists of a few more controls than the previous panel and provides a region-by-region look at revenue data. It includes a selector, called Selected Region, which allows a document analyst to select a different region for which to display data in the gauge graph. It also includes the title Regional Revenue and displays the total for the region the analyst selects. In this case, the total for the Southeast region is displayed.

In the examples above, the document designer provided both corporate and regional data within the document. He used panels in a panel stack to contain these different perspectives of data and added a selector to allow analysts to switch between one perspective, or panel, at a time. This is the typical workflow for creating a panel stack and making it available to analysts.

Adding a panel stack to a document
A panel stack is a holder for a collection of panels. Panels allow the user to see different predefined views of data in the same document. When you add a panel stack to a document, one panel is automatically added to the panel stack.

To insert a panel stack into a document:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Expand the document section where you want the panel stack by clicking the plus sign next to the section name.
    Note: You cannot add a panel stack to the Details section.
  3. Insert the panel stack into the document:
    From the Insert menu, select Panel Stack or click the Panel Stack icon in the Controls toolbar. When you move the mouse to the Layout area, the cursor becomes crosshairs.
  4. Click in the desired section of the Layout area. If you click and drag in the section, you can size the panel stack. The panel stack is added to the document, with a single panel.
  5. Adjust the position, size, titles, tooltips, and other aspects of the panel stack:
    You can create and/or adjust the position, size, titles, and tooltips of the panel stack. To do so, right-click the panel stack and select Properties. The Properties dialog box is displayed. For steps to adjust these aspects of the panel stack, see Adjusting the position, size, titles, and tooltips of a panel stack.
  6. You can add a line around the panel stack. For instructions, see Formatting the borders of a panel stack.
  7. You can rename the panel. This name is displayed on a selector. A selector allows users to switch between panels. The name can be displayed in the title bar of the panel stack.
  8. You can set the background fill of the panel.
  9. Add controls to the panel:
    You can add controls to the panel, in the same way you add controls to other parts of the document.
  10. You can add more panels to the panel stack.
  11. A selector allows you and other users to flip through the panels in the panel stack. For instructions to add a selector, see Creating a selector from a panel stack.

Working with a panel stack

In Design and Editable Mode, you can add, remove, and scroll through panels in a panel stack. To do so, select a panel stack and pass your cursor under the panel stack's blue title bar. A toolbar with the following icons is displayed at the top of the panel stack.

  • Move : Click and hold this icon to pick up the panel stack and drag it to another location in the document.
  • Insert : Adds a new panel after the current panel.
  • Remove : Deletes the current panel. The panel below the deleted panel becomes the current panel.
    Note: You cannot delete the current panel if it is the only panel in the panel stack.
  • Previous Panel : Sets the previous panel as the current panel, that is, the panel that is displayed.
  • Next Panel : Sets the next panel as the current panel.
  • Move Panel Back 1 : Reorders the panels in the panel stack by moving the current panel back one panel.
  • Move Panel Forward 1 : Reorders the panels in the panel stack by moving the current panel forward one panel.

Note: You can also choose whether to display the title bar, which displays either the panel stack title or the panel name. Set these properties using the Property List or the Properties dialog box; see Formatting panel stacks and panels for details.

Adding panels to a panel stack
Panels allow the user to see different predefined views of data in the same document. Each panel contains a separate set of data. Panels are contained in a panel stack, a holder for a collection of panels.

Prerequisites

The document must contain a panel stack. See Adding a panel stack to a document for directions.

To add a panel to a panel stack:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Select the panel stack and pass your cursor under its title bar. A toolbar of icons is displayed.
  3. Click the Insert icon. The new panel is added after the current panel.
  4. You can rename the panel. The name is displayed in a selector, which allows the user to switch between panels, and can be displayed in the title bar of the panel stack. For instructions to add a selector, see Adding a selector to a document.
  5. You can change the current panel. In PDF View, the current panel is what is displayed and what is printed; the user cannot change to a different panel. The current panel is displayed when a user opens the document in Interactive Mode, although the user can change to a different panel. To determine what the current panel should be, see Defining the current panel in a panel stack.
  6. You can reorder the panels for the panel stack.
  7. You can add controls to the panel, in the same way you add controls to other parts of the document.

Deleting panels from a panel stack
Panels allow the user to see different predefined views of data in the same document. Panels are contained in a panel stack, a holder for a collection of panels. Perform the steps below to delete a panel from a panel stack.

For information about what a panel stack is, see Adding panel stacks and panels.

Prerequisites

The document must contain multiple panels in the panel stack. You cannot delete the only panel in a panel stack. To do this, you delete the entire panel stack.

To delete a panel from a panel stack:

  1. For information about what a panel stack is, see Adding panel stacks and panels.
  2. Select the panel stack and pass your cursor near the top of it. A toolbar of icons is displayed.
  3. Click the Delete icon. If the deleted panel was the current panel, the panel below the deleted panel becomes the new current panel.

Defining the current panel in a panel stack
The current panel of a panel stack is the panel displayed in Design, Editable, View, or Interactive Mode.

  • In Design or Editable Mode, a document designer can set the current panel and add objects to it.
  • In View Mode, the current panel is displayed and is the panel that is printed; the document analyst can view the information on the panel, but cannot change to a different panel.
  • In Interactive Mode, the current panel is displayed when a user opens the document. The user can change to a different panel if they use a selector that a designer placed in the document. This is described in Creating a selector for a panel stack.

To set the current panel in a panel stack:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Select the panel stack and pass your cursor near the top of it. A toolbar of icons is displayed.
  3. Click the Previous Panel or Next Panel icon to set the previous or next panel as the current panel, respectively.

Renaming panels
Users switch between panels using a selector, such as a Drop-down. Panels are identified by name in the selector. If the title bar of the panel stack is displayed, the panel name can also be displayed there.

To rename a panel:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Select the panel stack and pass your cursor near the top of it. A toolbar of icons is displayed.
  3. Click the Previous Panel or Next Panel icon to set the previous or next panel as the current panel, respectively.
  4. Do one of the following:
    • Right-click the panel and select Rename Panel. Type a name for the panel in the Name field.
    • From the Format menu, select Properties. The Properties dialog box is displayed.
      • Select the General tab if it is not already selected.
      • Type a name for the panel in the Title field.
  5. Click OK to apply the changes to the panel stack and return to your document.

Reordering panels in a panel stack
A panel stack holds a collection of panels. Reordering those panels allows you to choose the order in which users view the panels.

Prerequisites

The document must contain multiple panels in the panel stack. To add panels to a panel stack, see Adding panels to a panel stack.

To reorder panels in a panel stack:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Select the panel stack and pass your cursor under its title bar. A toolbar of icons is displayed.
  3. Click the Previous Panel or Next Panel icon to select the panel you want to move.
  4. Once you have selected the panel to shift in the stack, do one of the following:
    • Click the Move Back 1 icon to incrementally move the selected panel backward.
    • Click the Move Forward 1 icon to incrementally move the selected panel forward.

Providing interactivity to users: Adding selectors
Selectors are a type of control that provides options to a user. By selecting an option from the selector, she determines what data is displayed in grid or graph reports in the document; which panel of a panel stack is displayed; or which dynamic text fields (a text field that is a reference to an object on a report) in a panel stack are displayed.

For example, the Radio Button and Drop-down are two available styles of selectors.

The following is an example of a Drop-down selector.

The following is an example of a Radio Button selector.

A document designer set up the selectors above in such a way that attribute elements (in this case, from the Book attribute) are displayed. A document analyst can select an attribute element from the drop-down or radio button list to display its data in the grid or graph to which it is connected. For example, a document analyst can select Prentice Hall from the radio button list to display data in a corresponding grid or graph report related to only Prentice Hall books.

In general, selectors allow a user, in Interactive Mode, Editable Mode, or Flash Mode to:

  • Flip through the panels in a panel stack. A panel stack is a collection of panels, which allow the user to see different predefined views of data in the same document. For example, each panel can display a different Grid/Graph, and the selector allows the user to choose which panel, and thus which Grid/Graph, to view.

The items of the selector are the buttons across the top, and the target is the panel stack. For more information on panels, see Layering data on dashboards: Adding panel stacks and panels.

  • Display different metrics or different elements of attributes, custom groups, or consolidations in a Grid/Graph. For example, a Grid/Graph contains Region, Call Center, Year, and various metrics, as shown in the example below. This particular selector allows the user to select which regions to display on the Grid/Graph. The user can therefore slice or filter the Grid/Graph by the selected region or regions. Similarly, a selector can allow the user to select which metrics to display. All regions and employees would be displayed, but with only the metrics chosen in the selector.



    In this example, the regions listed in the selector are the items of the selector; the target is the Grid/Graph.

  • Display different elements of attributes, custom groups, or consolidations in a panel stack. A dynamic text field is a text field populated by the dataset; it is essentially a reference to an object on a report. For example, a panel contains the dynamic text fields Region and Revenue from the Basic Report dataset. The image below shows the panel in Design view; the dynamic text fields are indicated by braces { }.

The selector control allows the user to select which region to display on the panel. The following image shows the same selector and panel in Interactive mode in MicroStrategy Web. Mid-Atlantic has been selected from the drop-down list of the selector control. Mid-Atlantic replaces {Region}, and the revenue amount for the Mid-Atlantic region replaces {Revenue}.

In this example, the regions listed in the drop-down list are the items of the selector; the target is the panel stack.

You can combine the last two scenarios—the same selector can control both a Grid/Graph and dynamic text fields on the same panel.

Note:
When a selector is first displayed, its target shows data for the first element in the target. To continue with the example of the dynamic text fields, the first attribute element is Central, so that data is displayed when the document is first opened. The selector also displays the first attribute element. (In the image shown above, Mid-Atlantic was selected after the document was initially displayed.). If a selector has multiple targets (such as a Grid/Graph and dynamic text fields), the targets may or may not contain the same elements. If all the targets do contain the same elements, the targets and selector all display the first element. If the targets have different elements, the first element for each target is displayed, and the selector shows nothing as selected. A drop-down list will have blank space, a button bar will not have any buttons selected, no radio buttons will be selected, and so on.

These uses of selectors allow you to create interactive dashboards, which summarize key business indicators in easy-to-read interfaces.

See Defining a selector for information on how to configure a selector once you add it to a document.

Defining a selector
When you insert a selector, you must define how it looks and what it controls. The following properties define a selector:

A selector is defined by:

  • DHTML Style, which determines how the options in the selector are displayed in Editable, Interactive, and View Mode. The options are:
    • Drop-down



    • Slider: This selector style is most effective when used to browse data in a graph. Place the graph slider under or above the graph it will control. Then, specify the graph as the target of the slider selector and specify one of the attributes or metrics in the graph as the selector's source. This allows an analyst to drag the slider to view different sets of data in a graph. He or she can also adjust the size of the slider to view different ranges of values in the graph.



    • Listbox



    • Button Bar: Use this selector style to create tabs in your document.



    • Radio Buttons



    • Link Bar: Use this selector style to create tabs in your document.



    • Checkboxes



  • Flash Style, which determines how the selector is displayed in Flash Mode, if it is an interactive Flash-only selector such as a Fish Eye Selector.
    • Fish Eye Selector: The Fish Eye Selector is an interactive style of selector that is displayed only in Flash Mode. It is a selector that magnifies an item when you hover the cursor over it. This style of selector is useful because it allows you to choose from a large list of elements without having to see all of the elements displayed at once. Any item that you hover over or select remains magnified, while the remaining items are minimized and hidden from view. In Interactive, Editable, and View Mode, a Fish Eye Selector can be displayed as one of the DHTML styles of selectors listed above. To specify which style to use in these modes, from the Selector tab on the Properties dialog box, select a style from the DHTML Style drop-down list.

      The image below depicts a Fish Eye Selector to the left of a grid that it controls.
      When the Grand Rapids city is chosen from the selector, the target grid on the right displays data for Grand Rapids.

    For more information about creating selector widgets, see Creating an interactive, Flash-only, selector.

  • Action Type, which sets whether the selector displays attribute, custom group, or consolidation elements; metrics; or panels.
  • Source, which is the attribute, custom group, or consolidation whose elements are displayed in the selector. You select a source only when the selector displays elements (when Select Element is selected in Action Type, above).
  • Target(s), which are the Grid/Graphs and/or panel stacks that the selector affects. For the Action Type of Panel, the target can only be a single panel stack.

Selector example

The image below provides an example of a Radio button selector (at the top of the image, above the graph report) and the graph report that it controls. A document analyst can select a radio button to display that region's data in the graph report.

To add this selector to a document and 'connect' it to the graph report correctly, a document designer specified the following for the selector:

  • DHTML Style: Radio Buttons.
  • Source: The Region attribute. This ensures that each radio button corresponds to a different region in the report.
  • Action Type: Select Element. This ensures that the selector displays a list of the elements from the attribute selected in the Source field, in this case, the Region attribute. For example, the Central, South, and Northeast regions are included as radio button options. When an analyst clicks a radio button, data from that region is displayed on the graph report.
  • Target: The graph report directly below the selector is the Target. This ensures that the graph report is the object in the document that is updated when an analyst clicks a radio button.

Methods to create a selector
You can create a selector in a variety of different ways, depending on what the target and source are, as well as personal preference for a particular interface. The following table helps you choose between the methods.

To Create a New Selector
Do This...
With a panel stack as the target Right-click the panel stack and select Create Panel Stack Selector.
With a Grid/Graph as the target and elements as the source Right-click the attribute, custom group, or consolidation on the Grid/Graph and select Create Selector.
With a Grid/Graph as the target and a metric as the source In Web, right-click the word Metrics on the Grid/Graph and select Create Selector.
With an attribute as the source

Right-click the attribute in the Dataset Objects and select Create Selector.

The new selector does not have a target; you must specify the Grid/Graph or panel stack to use as the target, as described below the table.

That updates a dynamic text field on a panel stack Insert a selector. Specify the panel stack to use as the target and the attribute for the source, as described below the table.
With a specific style

Do one of the following:

  • From the Insert menu, point to Selector, and then choose the style from the list.
  • Click the arrow next to the Selector icon on the toolbar, and then choose the style from the list.
    Next, click in the Layout area to add the selector.

The new selector does not have a target; you must specify the Grid/Graph or panel stack to use as the target, as described below the table.
The default action type is select elements, although you can change it to select metrics or panels.

With the same style as the last selector you added

Click the Selector icon in the Controls toolbar. Click in the Layout area to add the selector.

The new selector does not have a target; you must specify the Grid/Graph or panel stack to use as the target, as described below the table.

The default action type is select elements, although you can change it to select metrics or panels.

That is formatted differently in Flash Mode and becomes interactive when a user hovers the cursor over them.

An example is the Fish Eye Selector, which magnifies the item that is hovered over, while the remaining items are minimized and displayed in the background of the selector.

For information and instructions, see Creating an interactive, Flash-only selector.


Note: You can also use an attribute on a Grid/Graph as a selector that targets a panel stack or another Grid/Graph. If a user clicks an attribute on the first Grid/Graph, the target changes to display information for only that attribute. For more information, see Enabling a Grid/Graph to control another Grid/Graph.

After you create a new selector, you can use the Properties dialog box to change any properties, such as style or action type. For example, the default style of a new selector is a drop-down list, which may not always suit your needs.

Adding a selector to a document
Selectors allow a user, in Interactive, Editable, or Flash Mode, to flip through the panels in a panel stack, or display different attribute, custom group, or consolidation elements or metrics in a Grid/Graph. The panel stack or Grid/Graph is the target of the selector. For more conceptual information about selectors and examples, see Adding selectors.

Prerequisites

You must have added at least one panel stack or Grid/Graph to the document, to use as the target of the selector. For instructions, see Adding panels or Adding a Grid/Graph.

To insert a selector:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Expand the section where you want the selector by clicking the plus sign next to the section name.
  3. Click the arrow next to the Selector Control icon in the toolbar, and then choose how to display the selector from the drop-down list. For information and an example of each style of selector, see Defining a selector. When you move the mouse to the layout area, the pointer becomes crosshairs.
  4. Click in the desired section of the layout area. If you click and drag in the section, you can size the selector. The selector is added to the document.
  5. Right-click the new selector, and select Properties. The Properties dialog box opens.
  6. Click the Selector tab.
  7. Determine the options a user can select in the selector (the Action Type):
    From the Action Type drop-down list, determine what the selector will be used to do. For example, will the selector be used to choose different attribute, custom group, or consolidation elements, or a panel within a panel stack? Choose from the following:
    • Select Element: When the document is displayed, the selector will display a list of the elements from the attribute selected in the Source field.
    • Select Metric: When the document is displayed, the selector will display a list of the metrics available in the Grid/Graphs selected as the Target.
      Note: Metrics in text fields within the target are not listed. For example, a panel stack is selected as a Target and contains a metric in a text field. That metric is not displayed in the Select Metrics list.
    • Select Panel: When the document is displayed, the selector will display a list of the panels available in the panel stack selected as the Target.
      Note: If Style is set to Checkboxes, Select Panel is unavailable, since you cannot display multiple panels simultaneously. Select a different Style to display panels.
  8. Determine where the options in the selector are coming from (the Source):
    If you chose Select Element as the Action Type, select a Source from the drop-down list. The Source list contains all of the attributes in all of the datasets in the document. The selector displays the elements of the attribute, custom group, or consolidation selected as the Source.
  9. Choose a selector style:
    You can change the style of the selector by choosing another option from the Style drop-down list. See step 3 for a list of the styles.
  10. By default, the selector shows the All option, which allows the user to display all the elements or metrics in the Target at one time. To disable the All option, clear the Show option for All check box.
    Note: This option is not available if the Action Type is set to Select Panel, or the Style is set to Slider and the Allow multiple selections check box is selected.
  11. To allow the user to choose multiple options in the selector, select the Allow multiple selections check box. For all other styles, this check box is unavailable and the option is disabled, since those styles do not support multiple selections.
  12. For Slider, Radio Buttons, Checkboxes, and Button Bar, the Orientation option is available. You can select whether to display the selector horizontally (on a single line from left to right) or vertically (in a single column).
  13. Determine what the selector will affect (the Target):
    From the list of available Targets on the right, select Grid/Graph(s) and/or panel stack(s) and click > to add them to the list of Selected Targets.
    • If the Action Type is set to Select Panel, you can only select a single panel stack. The panels in this panel stack are displayed in the selector.
    • If the Action Type is set to Select Element or Select Metric, you can select single or multiple Grid/Graphs or panel stacks, or any combination of Grid/Graphs and panel stacks. The target Grid/Graph displays the elements or metrics that the user chooses in the selector.
  14. Click OK to return to the document.

Creating a selector for a panel stack
Selectors allow a user, in Interactive and Editable Mode, to flip through the panels in a panel stack. The panel stack is the target of the selector. The default style of the selector is set to Drop-down.

Prerequisites

You must have added a panel stack to the document, to use as the target of the selector. For instructions, see Adding panel stacks.

To create a selector for a panel stack:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Right-click the panel stack to use as the target of the selector, and select Create Panel Selector. A selector is created just above the panel. The selected panel stack is the target and the Action Type is set to Select Panel.
  3. To modify any options on the selector, such as Style or Auto-submit:
    • Right-click the selector and choose Properties. The Properties dialog box opens.
    • Click the Selector tab.
    • For more information on each option, see Properties dialog box: Selector tab.
    • Click OK to return to the document.

Creating a selector for an attribute on a Grid/Graph
You can select an attribute on a Grid/Graph and create a selector to allow a user, in Interactive or Flash Mode, to select which attribute elements to display in the Grid/Graph.
You can also create a selector from custom groups and consolidations on a Grid/Graph. Do this the same way you work with attributes.

The default style of the selector is set to Drop-down and the Show All option is cleared, although you can change these defaults.

Prerequisites

A Grid/Graph must already exist in the document, so it can be defined as the target of the selector. For instructions, see Adding a Grid/Graph.

To create a selector from an attribute:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Right-click the attribute name (not an attribute element) in the Grid/Graph to use as the target of the selector, and select Create Selector Control. A selector is created just above the Grid/Graph. The selected attribute is the source, the selected Grid/Graph is the target, and the Action Type is set to Select Element.
  3. To modify any options on the selector, such as Show All or Style:
    • Right-click the selector and choose Properties. The Properties dialog box opens.
    • Click the Selector tab.
    • For more information on each option, see Properties dialog box: Selector tab.
    • Click OK to return to the document.

Creating a selector for an attribute in the Dataset Objects
You can select an attribute in the Dataset Objects panel and create a selector to allow a user, in Interactive or Flash Mode, to select which attribute elements to display in the Grid/Graph. You can also create a selector from custom groups and consolidations in the Dataset Objects. Do this the same way you work with attributes.

The default style of the selector is set to Drop-down and the Show All option is cleared, although you can change these defaults.

Prerequisites

You must have added the Grid/Graph to the document, to use as the target of the selector. For instructions, see Adding a Grid/Graph.

To create a selector from an attribute in the Dataset Objects panel:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Right-click the attribute in the Dataset Objects to use as the source of the selector, and select Add Element Selector. A selector is created in the current section. The selected attribute is the source and the Action Type is set to Select Element.
    OR
    Drag the attribute from the Dataset Objects and drop it on top of the selector. The attribute is set as the source of the selector.
  3. Right-click the selector and choose Select Target. The Target icons are displayed in a small dialog box.
  4. In the layout area, select the Grid/Graph(s) to use as the target(s) of the selector and click the OK icon on the Select Targets toolbar. The selected Grid/Graphs are the target of the selector. To remove a Grid/Graph as a target, click the Cancel icon on the Select Targets toolbar.
  5. To modify any options on the selector, such as Show All or Style:
    • Right-click the selector and choose Properties. The Properties dialog box opens.
    • Click the Selector tab.
    • For more information on each option, see Properties dialog box: Selector tab.
    • Click OK to return to the document.

Creating a selector for a metric on a Grid/Graph
You can select a metric on a Grid/Graph and create a selector to allow a user, in Interactive or Flash Mode, to select which metrics to display in the Grid/Graph.

The default style of the selector is set to Drop-down and the Show All option is cleared, although you can change these defaults.

Prerequisites

You must have added the Grid/Graph to the document, to use as the target of the selector. For instructions, see Adding a Grid/Graph.

To create a selector from a metric:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Right-click any metric in the Grid/Graph to use as the target of the selector, and select Create Selector Control. A selector is created just above the Grid/Graph. The selected Grid/Graph is the target and the Action Type is set to Select Metric.
  3. To modify any options on the selector, such as Show All or Style:
    • Right-click the selector and choose Properties. The Properties dialog box opens.
    • Click the Selector tab.
    • Make selections in the Selector tab. For more information on each option, see Properties dialog box: Selector tab.
    • Click OK to return to the document.

Creating an interactive, Flash-only selector
You can choose from several styles of selectors to add to your document, as described in Defining a selector. Some selectors are more interactive than standard selectors when they are displayed in Flash Mode. These unique selectors look like standard selectors in Editable, Interactive, and View Mode, but are formatted differently in Flash Mode and become interactive when a user hovers the cursor over them.

The image below depicts a Fish Eye Selector, which is one of these interactive, Flash-only styles of selectors. The Fish Eye Selector is a selector that magnifies an item when you hover the cursor over it as you work in Flash Mode. Any item that you hover over or select remains magnified, while the remaining items are minimized and displayed in the background of the selector. In the sample below, the Fish Eye Selector on the left contains a list of cities. When Grand Rapids is chosen in the selector, the target grid on the right is updated to display data related to the city of Grand Rapids.

You can create an interactive, Flash-only selector such as the Fish Eye Selector from scratch or by applying its style to an existing selector.

To create an interactive, Flash-only selector:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. On the Controls toolbar, from the Selector Control drop-down menu, choose Fish Eye Selector.
  3. Click a location on your document in which to place the selector. You cannot place it in the Detail section of a document. The selector is displayed in its default DHTML style, as explained below. For example, the Fish Eye Selector is displayed as a Listbox in Editable, Interactive, and View Mode.
  4. If desired, resize the selector by clicking and dragging its handles.
  5. Right-click the selector, and select Properties. The Properties dialog box opens.
  6. Click the Selector tab.
  7. From the DHTML Style drop-down list, choose the style in which the selector is displayed in Editable, Interactive, and View Mode. Note that the style listed in the Flash Style drop-down list is the same name as the selector you chose because you chose a Flash-only style of selector.
  8. Define the selector and its targets. For the steps, see Adding a selector to a document.
  9. Click OK to apply the changes.

To view and interact with the selector, switch to Flash Mode by selecting Flash Mode from the View menu.

Prerequisites

This procedure assumes that a selector is already in the document. For the steps, see Adding a selector to a document.

To make an existing selector an interactive, Flash-only selector:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Right-click the selector, and select Properties. The Properties dialog box opens.
  3. Click the Selector tab.
  4. From the Flash Style drop-down list, choose Fish Eye Selector.
  5. Click OK to apply the changes.

To view and interact with the selector widget, switch to Flash Mode by selecting Flash Mode from the View menu.

Selecting targets interactively
Target selection mode allows you to choose targets interactively. That is, you click the Grid/Graph or panel stack to use as the target of the selector.

To select targets for a selector:

  1. Right-click the selector and choose Select Target. The Target icons are displayed in a small dialog box.
  2. Click the Grid/Graph or panel stack to specify as the target. The sizing handles of the target are displayed.
    • To select multiple targets, use CTRL+click, that is, hold down the CTRL key while you click each control.
  3. Click the Select Target icon to confirm that the Grid/Graph or panel stack you selected is the target of the selector.
  4. To remove an assigned target, select the Grid/Graph or panel stack and click the Remove Target icon .

Controlling how data updates in a selector
Automatic submission in a selector means that once a user chooses an option in the selector, the target (for example, a Grid/Graph) immediately updates without any additional user interaction. If multiple objects are selected, the target is automatically updated after each individual selection, which can take some time. Therefore, if multiple objects are allowed, disable automatic submission, allowing the user to choose when to update the target. The user can select either a single object or multiple objects, and then click Apply to update the target.

If there is more than one selector in a document, you can disable or enable automatic submission for all of the selectors in a document. You cannot adjust this behavior for a specific control.

To disable automatic submission in a selector:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. From the Format menu, select Document Properties. The Document Properties dialog box is displayed.
  3. On the Other tab, clear the Automatically apply selector changes check box.
  4. Click OK to return to the document.

You can determine if the Apply button on the Standard toolbar and/or a floating toolbar with an Apply button is used to apply changes to a selector. For more information, see Preferences.

Turning the All option off for items in a selector
The document in the following image is shown in Editable Mode. It contains a Grid/Graph with a link bar selector. The items of the selector are the regions from the Grid/Graph. The user has clicked (All) in the selector, so all the regions are displayed in the Grid/Graph.

The All option is displayed by default in a selector, but you can remove it by disabling the Show option for All property. The same document, with this property disabled, looks like the following:

Now a user can only display each region separately; he cannot display all regions simultaneously.

Note: The All option is not available when the target of the selector is a panel stack, since you cannot display multiple panels simultaneously.

To disable simultaneous display of all items:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Right-click the selector to modify and select Properties.
  3. Select the Selector tab.
  4. Clear the Show option for All check box.
  5. Click OK to apply the changes and close the dialog box.

Renaming the All option of a selector
The All option allows a user to display all the items in the selector. For example, a Grid/Graph displays metrics for employees and regions. The user can choose which regions to display by using a selector. If the user clicks the (All) item, all the regions are displayed in the Grid/Graph. This example is shown in Turning the All option off for items in a selector.

By default, this item is displayed as (All), but you can replace the text of the item. To continue with the example, replace (All) with 'All Regions' to provide an explicit description of the item. This is shown below.

To rename the All option of a selector:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Right-click the selector to modify and select Properties.
  3. Select the Selector tab.
  4. Select the Show option for All check box.
  5. Enter the new name of the item in the Alias field.
  6. Click OK to apply the changes and close the dialog box.

Allowing a selector to be updated by other selectors
A panel displays a Grid/Graph with Call Center and Region as the attributes. The panel also contains a selector that lists Call Centers and targets the Grid/Graph. Outside of the panel stack, another selector lists Regions. Its target is the panel stack and therefore the selector on that panel as well. Refer to the selectors as the regional selector and the call center selector.

In Interactive Mode or Editable Mode, choose Central in the regional selector. The first Call Center, Milwaukee, is displayed in the Grid/Graph. Also, the selector that lists Call Centers will automatically display the Milwaukee call center. Choose Fargo in the call center selector, and the Grid/Graph is updated. Choose Northeast in the regional selector, and the Grid/Graph displays a message that no data is returned. The Grid/Graph is trying to return data that is both Region = Northeast and Call Center = Fargo, but no such data exists. The call center selector will be blank.

If you would instead like the Grid/Graph to automatically display the first Call Center in the new Region, allow the call center selector to be updated by other selectors. In the previous scenario, when you choose Northeast, Boston is now displayed in the Grid/Graph. The call center selector will automatically display Boston.

Prerequisites

  • The selector that you want to be automatically updated must be on a panel.
  • The selector that will update the first selector must target the panel stack.

To allow a selector to be updated by other selectors

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Right-click the selector to modify and choose Properties. The Properties dialog box opens.
  3. Click the Selector tab.
  4. Select the Allow selector to be updated by other selectors check box.
  5. Click OK to return to the document.

Enabling a Grid/Graph to control another Grid/Graph: Using Grid/Graphs as selectors
In the following image, two Grid/Graphs are shown. The one on the left, which is displayed as a grid, shows revenue by region. The one on the right, which is displayed as a graph, shows revenue by quarter and region. Notice that the two Grid/Graphs share a particular attribute (Region) and that region in the grid is underlined, indicating a link.

The graph on the right represents regional revenue by quarter.

Click a specific region, such as Mid-Atlantic, in the grid. The graph changes to display information for that region only, as shown below:

The grid on the left is controlling the graph on the right. In other words, this scenario uses one Grid/Graph as a selector targeting another Grid/Graph. The Grid/Graph does not become a selector, but performs in a manner similar to a selector. A panel stack, rather than another Grid/Graph, can be the target of a Grid/Graph.

Prerequisites

This procedure assumes you have already created a Grid/Graph to use as the selector, as well as the panel stack or Grid/Graph to use as the target. The selector and target must have an attribute in common.

To use a Grid/Graph as a selector:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. On a Grid/Graph, right-click the attribute to use as the selector, and choose Edit Selector. The Edit Selector dialog box opens.
  3. Select the target Grid/Graph or panel stack in the list of available controls on the right, and click > to add it to the list of selected targets. You can select multiple targets.
  4. The All option in a selector allows the user to display all the elements or metrics in the Target at one time. To enable the All option, select the Show option for All check box.
  5. Click OK to return to the document.

Providing Flash-based interactivity and analysis to users: Adding and defining widgets
A widget is a type of Report Services control that presents data in a visual and interactive way. You can think of widgets as interactive Flash-only graphs that dynamically update when you select a new set of data to view. You can even interact with some types of widgets to manually select a set of data to analyze. Several widget types, such as the Gauge or Interactive Stacked Area widget are available. Although each type of widget looks different and is used in a unique way, the main purpose of widgets is the same: to provide document analysts with a visual and interactive look into their data.

In Design or Editable Mode, a document designer adds widgets to a document and defines them. However, the designer and other users can interact with widgets in Flash Mode only.

Once you, as the document designer, place a widget in a document, you must place report objects such as attributes and metrics on the widget's template to define it as you might define any grid report template. Each type of widget requires a specific number, type, and arrangement of report objects on its widget template. For information about the data and template requirements for each type of widget, see Data requirements for widgets: Quick Reference Table.

Example: Adding and defining a widget

When you add a Cylinder widget to a document in Editable Mode, it looks very similar to a standard Grid/Graph control. In fact, in the object selector in the Formatting toolbar , the widget template is considered a type of Grid/Graph control when it is selected.

In the image below, the new Cylinder widget is shown on the right. The Dataset Objects panel is displayed on the left to give you an idea of the report and report objects with which the designer is working.

To define the widget, report object such as attributes and metrics must be placed on the widget template. To successfully define a Cylinder widget, one attribute must be placed on the widget template's rows and one metric must be placed on the columns, as shown below. The Supplier attribute is placed on the rows and the Units Sold metric is placed on the columns.

It is very useful to include a selector alongside the widget. In this case, the selector will be used by a document analyst to switch between different suppliers (the attribute elements of the Supplier attribute).

The selector is designed as follows:

  • The DHTML Style is the Drop-down style.
  • The Target is the Cylinder widget template. In this case, this is Grid/Graph33, the name of the widget. The target ensures that, when an item is selected from the drop-down list, the widget template is updated accordingly.
  • The Source is the Supplier attribute. The source ensures that the selector consists of attribute elements from the Supplier attribute.

For more information about creating selectors (and connecting them to Grid/Graphs or panel stacks), see Adding selectors.

The Cylinder widget only becomes a visual and interactive analysis tool when it is viewed in Flash Mode. In Flash Mode, the Cylinder widget presents a vertical cylinder with liquid in it; the level of the liquid within the cylinder depicts a specific metric value. In this case, the metric value is the number of units sold. Notice also that the look and feel of the selector changes in Flash Mode.

To display the number labels on the right of the cylinder, right-click the cylinder and select Properties. By default, the minimum and maximum values for a Cylinder widget are 0 to 100. Since the metric values are much larger on this report, you should change the maximum value to something like 700, to accommodate the largest metric values on the report.

Another convenient addition to the widget/selector combination shown above is a grid version of the report. For this example, you might add the grid report shown in the Dataset Objects panel above. The grid report allows you and document analysts to see how one attribute element's value compares against other values. You can also sort the grid report and pivot objects on it. In this example, the full grid report allows you to see how one supplier's revenue compares with other suppliers. To add a grid report next to the widget, simply drag the report from the Dataset Objects panel and drop it next to the widget.

For a description of the types of widgets available for documents, see Understanding and working with widgets. For information about the data and template requirements for each type of widget, see Data requirements for widgets: Quick Reference Table.

Prerequisites

You must have the necessary document designer privileges to add a widget to a document and add report objects to it.

To insert a widget into a document:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
    • If the document does not contain a dataset in the Dataset Objects panel, add a dataset to the document by selecting Add Dataset from the Data menu.
  2. On the Controls toolbar, from the Widgets drop-down menu, select a type of widget. For example, you can select the Interactive Bubble Graph widget. For a description of the types of widgets available for documents, see Understanding and working with widgets.
  3. Click a location on your document in which to place the widget. You cannot place the widget in the Detail section of a document. The widget container, which looks like a standard grid container, is displayed. A small icon is displayed at the bottom right of the widget container, identifying the type of widget you added to the document.
  4. If desired, resize the widget by clicking and dragging its handles.
  5. Define the widget:
    Once you place a widget in your document, you must place report objects such as attributes and metrics on its widget template to define it as you might define any grid report template. Each type of widget requires a specific number, type, and arrangement of report objects on its widget template. See the following topics for steps to define the type of widget you are working with. Also refer to Data Requirements for widgets: Quick Reference Table for a detailed table of all widget template requirements for each type of widget.
    Note: Report objects included on the widget template must come from the same dataset.
  6. View the widget in Flash Mode:
    To view and interact with the widget, switch to Flash Mode by selecting Flash Mode from the View menu.

Understanding and working with widgets
The sections below describe each type of widget, its purpose, and how a document analyst can use it to analyze a specific set of data.

Notes:

  • To create a widget that is displayed correctly in Flash Mode, a document designer must place and position the correct number of report objects on the widget template in Editable Mode. For important information on the widget template requirements for each type of widget, see Data requirements for widgets: Quick Reference Table. For steps to insert a widget into a document, see Adding and defining widgets.
  • With the MicroStrategy SDK, you can access additional MicroStrategy widgets, add third-party widgets, and create and use custom widgets. For more information and instructions, see the MicroStrategy Developer Library (MSDL), part of the MicroStrategy SDK product. For information on purchasing a MicroStrategy SDK license, contact your Account Executive. You can also download widgets from the MicroStrategy Widget download site https://resource.microstrategy.com/Support.
    • If you are incorporating a custom widget into your MicroStrategy Web application and want to make multiple data providers available for the widget, see the MicroStrategy Developer Library (MSDL) for information to expose the Secondary Data Provider area in the Flash tab of the Properties dialog box. This allows users to select more than one data provider for the widget.
    • If you are designing a document using a custom widget and you see the Secondary Data Provider area in the Flash tab of the Properties dialog box, contact your customization specialist for information on how to use their custom implementation.

You can work with the following types of widgets in a document:

  • Gauge: A simple status indicator that displays a needle that moves within a range of numbers displayed on its outside edges. An example of a gauge is a car's speedometer. Like the Cylinder and Thermometer widgets, this type of widget is designed to display the value of a single metric. The needle within the gauge is a visual representation of that single metric value.

    The Gauge widget is most useful when combined with a selector because this allows users to choose specific metric values to display in the gauge. In the image below, the location of the needle in the gauge represents revenue in millions (the Revenue metric).

    For important information on the widget template requirements for this type of widget, see Data requirements for widgets: Quick Reference Table.




  • Cylinder: A simple status indicator that displays a vertical cylinder with fluid in it. The level of the fluid within the cylinder is a visual representation of a single metric value. Like the Gauge and Thermometer widgets, this type of widget is designed to display the value of a single metric.

    The Cylinder widget is most useful when combined with a selector because this allows users to choose specific metric values to display in the cylinder. In the image below, the liquid level in the cylinder represents the amount of units sold in millions (the Units Sold metric).

    For important information on the widget template requirements for this type of widget, see Data requirements for widgets: Quick Reference Table.

  • Thermometer: A simple status indicator that displays a thermometer set to a certain temperature level. The temperature level within the thermometer is a visual representation of a single metric value. This type of widget is ideal for tracking progress toward a goal. Like the Gauge and Cylinder widgets, this type of widget is designed to display the value of a single metric.

    The Thermometer widget is most useful when combined with a selector because this allows users to selectively choose specific metric values to display in the thermometer. In the image below, the thermometer level represents the Percent Participation metric.

    For important information on the widget template requirements for this type of widget, see Data requirements for widgets: Quick Reference Table.

  • Time Series Slider: An area graph that allows a document analyst to choose which section of the graph to view at a time. The widget consists of two related graphs, one positioned above the other. The top graph is the controller, and contains a slider. The bottom graph is the primary graph. You use the slider on the controller (the top graph) to select some portion of the controller, which determines the range of data visible in the primary graph (the bottom graph).

    Time series datasets are often long and require analysis from both a macro and micro view. Therefore, the time series slider widget requires only one attribute, preferably one with many values. This attribute is normally time-based, but it does not have to be. The widget also requires only one metric. In the graph:
    • The X-axis represents the attribute. In the image below, this is the Month attribute.
    • The Y-axis represents the metric. In the image below, this is the Revenue metric.

    For important information on the widget template requirements for this type of widget, see Data requirements for widgets: Quick Reference Table.

    You can enable an attribute, custom group, or consolidation on the widget's template as a selector, as explained in Viewing data related to a widget: Using widgets as selectors. This allows you to use the graph controller or primary graph as a selector. For details about using these parts of the widget as selectors, see Using a Time Series Slider widget as a selector.

  • Interactive Bubble Graph: A conventional bubble plot that allows you to visualize the trends of three different metrics for a set of attribute elements. The data structure for an interactive bubble chart is very specific. At minimum, one attribute and three metrics are required. In the bubble chart:
    • One bubble is displayed for each attribute element.
    • Each bubble’s position on the X-axis represents the value of the first metric.
    • Each bubble's position on the Y-axis represents the value of the second metric.
    • The size of each bubble represents the value of the third metric.
      Note: To ensure that different groups of attribute elements are displayed as different colored bubbles, you can add an additional attribute above the first three metrics on the columns. This is described in detail in Data requirements for widgets: Quick Reference Table.

The Interactive Bubble Graph is interactive, unlike a standard bubble graph report. For example:

    • Analysts can view specific metric information for a bubble by hovering over the bubble. He or she can also hover over an item in the graph legend to highlight all bubbles associated with that item. This allows analysts to better visualize groups of related data in the widget.
    • Analysts can drill into the components of a bubble to see the underlying data within that bubble's data. For example, she can drill on a Region bubble (the parent attribute) down to bubbles that represent different cities (child attributes) within that region. To drill on a bubble in the bubble chart, the analyst clicks on any of the parent attribute bubbles. In the chart below, the green bubbles have been drilled to their child attribute element bubbles. To enable drilling in the bubble chart, the designer must add an additional attribute to the left of the other attribute on the widget template rows. For specific requirements, refer to Data requirements for widgets: Quick Reference Table.
    • Analysts can see a time-series animation that plots the bubble values through time. To see this kind of animation, she can move the time slider or click the animation play button, shown in the image below. To enable time series animation in the chart, a designer must place a third attribute at the far left of the widget template rows. For specific requirements, refer to Data requirements for widgets: Quick Reference Table.

For important information on the widget template requirements for the Interactive Bubble Graph widget, see Data requirements for widgets: Quick Reference Table.

You can enable an attribute, custom group, or consolidation on the widget's template as a selector, as explained in Viewing data related to a widget: Using widgets as selectors. This allows you to click a bubble in the graph or an item in the graph legend to display related data in target Grid/Graphs and panel stacks.
For details about using these parts of the widget as selectors, see Using an Interactive Bubble Graph widget as a selector.

  • Interactive Stacked Graph: A combination of a check box list and area graph. The graph allows a user to see the contribution of various metric series to the change in value of a larger set of data.
    • By selecting individual attribute elements (for example, a list of years) using the check boxes, analysts determine the data that is displayed on the area graph on the right. When all check boxes are selected, the area graph is at its maximum size because it is representing contributions from each individual element.
    • This widget allows you to visualize total metric values as one large stacked area, and the individual pieces of that total as smaller stacked areas within the large stacked area. You can quickly analyze how the individual parts make up the whole, which is useful when making percent-to-total comparisons. To see how the individual parts make up the whole, click the name of the attribute element on the left; you can select multiple items by holding CTRL and selecting elements.

    The data requirements for this type of widget are as follows:

    • One attribute on the widget template's rows, which is displayed on the graph's X-axis. In the image below, this is the Month of Year attribute.
    • One attribute on the widget template's columns, which is represented by the check box list on the left. In the image below, this is the Region attribute.
    • One metric on the widget template's columns, which is displayed on the graph's Y-axis. In the image below, this is the Revenue metric.

For important information on the widget template requirements for this type of widget, see Data requirements for widgets: Quick Reference Table.

You can enable an attribute, custom group, or consolidation on the widget's template as a selector, as explained in Viewing data related to a widget: Using widgets as selectors. This allows you to click attribute elements in the checklist or area graphs to display related data in target Grid/Graphs and panel stacks. For details about using these parts of the widget as selectors, see Using an Interactive Stacked Graph widget as a selector.

  • Heat Map: A combination of colored rectangles, each representing an attribute element, that allows you to quickly grasp the state and impact of a large number of variables at once. Heat Maps are often used in the financial services industry to review the status of a portfolio. The rectangles contain a wide variety of colors and shades, which emphasize the weight of the various components. In a Heat Map, the size of each rectangle represents its relative weight, while the color represents the relative change in value of that rectangle. You can hover over each individual rectangle to see which attribute element the rectangle represents and its metric values.

    The data requirements for a Heat Map widget include one or more attributes on the widget template's rows and two metrics on the columns. For information on what each object is represented by on the widget, review the following example.


    Note: Some of the rectangles in the Heat Map widget below are hidden from view.



    • The large areas, such as the Electronics area of rectangles, represent different categories of products. These rectangles are generated by the first attribute on the rows of the widget template. In this case, the first attribute is Category. Notice that the name of each category is displayed in the headers of each of these areas.
    • The small rectangles (colored shades of green and black in the image above) represent different regions in which products are sold. These smaller rectangles, such as the Northwest and Southeast rectangles above, are generated by any additional attributes on the rows. In this case, a second attribute, Customer Region, is on the rows of the widget template.
    • The size of each rectangle represents its relative weight. This is determined by the first metric on the columns of the widget template. This widget shows that the Mid-Atlantic region is weighted more heavily than the Southwest region in regard to sales of electronics. In this case, the first metric on the columns of the widget template is Profit.
    • The colors displayed in the widget represent different ranges of profit generated by the company. In the widget above, green denotes higher revenue and black denotes lower revenue. The colors applied to each rectangle are generated by the second metric on the widget template. In this case, the second metric on the widget template is Revenue. You can change the colors used to denote these values. For steps, see Formatting a Heat Map widget. You can also rearrange the objects on the Heat Map from Flash Mode to produce a different heat map. For details, see the information below.

You can do the following while viewing a Heat Map widget in Flash Mode:

  • Reorder the attributes used in the widget template to display different combinations in the Heat Map. This allows you to reorder attributes without having to return to Design or Editable Mode.

    To reorder the attributes, click the Show/Hide button. Then, drag the attributes to the desired location. The left-most attributes create the headers in the Heat Map and the right-most attribute creates the individual rectangles under each header.


  • Specify the metric that determines the size of the rectangles in the Heat Map. This allows you to determine the first metric on the widget template's columns, which is the metric that determines the sizes of the rectangles. This is convenient because you can make this change without having to return to Design Mode or Editable Mode.

    To specify this metric, click the Show/Hide button. Then, select the metric from the Size Set By drop-down list.


  • Specify the metric that determines the color of the rectangles in the Heat Map. This allows you to determine the second metric on the widget template's columns, which is the metric that determines the colors of the rectangles. This is convenient because you can make this change without having to return to Design Mode or Editable Mode.

    To specify this metric, click the Show/Hide button. Then, select the metric from the Color Set By drop-down list.


  • Zoom in to a particular rectangle in the Heat Map for a closer view of the data within the rectangle. To zoom into a rectangle, click the Zoom icon and select the rectangle to zoom in to.

  • Remove rectangles from the Heat Map to provide additional room for other rectangles or to eliminate outliers. To remove a rectangle, hover the cursor over it and click the X icon at the top right of the rectangle. To display the names of all the rectangles that have been removed, click the List of Deleted Items icon in the task pane at the top of the Heat Map. To replace any rectangles that you remove, click the Refresh icon on the Heat Map. The Heat Map returns to its original state.

You can choose to create a dynamic Heat Map that an analyst can control using a selector. This type of Heat Map is considered dynamic because a user can use the selector to choose a different attribute element to view on the heat map. For steps to create a dynamic heat map, see Creating a dynamic Heat Map.

For important information on the widget template requirements for this type of widget, see Data requirements for widgets: Quick Reference Table.

Data requirements for widgets: Quick Reference Table
To successfully create a useful widget that can be used to analyze data, you must first correctly define it. After you add a widget to a document, you must place report objects such as attributes and metrics on the widget's template, which resembles a standard grid template. The report objects and their placement on the widget template determine whether the widget can be successfully generated and display data in Flash Mode. Refer to the table below for descriptions of the widget template requirements for each type of widget. The table also lists whether or not you need to create a selector to work with the widget, since some widgets do not come with their own selectors (for example, the Gauge widget) and some do (for example, the Interactive Stacked Graph).

For steps to add and define a widget, see Adding and defining widgets.

For steps to insert a selector into a document, see Adding selectors.

Widget Type Selector required to interact with the widget? Report Objects required on the widget template
Gauge Yes

- One attribute on the rows. The attribute elements are displayed in the selector you use to display different data in the widget.

- One metric on the columns. The metric values determine the location of the needle on the gauge.

(No maximum number of attributes and metrics)

Cylinder Yes

- One attribute on the rows. The attribute elements are displayed in the selector you use to display different data in the widget.

- One metric on the columns. The metric values determine the amount of liquid displayed in the cylinder.

(No maximum number of attributes and metrics)

Thermometer Yes

- One attribute on the rows. The attribute elements are displayed in the selector you use to display different data in the widget.

- One metric on the columns. The metric values determine the temperature level within the thermometer.

(No maximum number of attributes and metrics)

Time Series Slider No

- One attribute on the rows, preferably time-based. The attribute elements are displayed along the X-axis.

- One metric on the columns. The metric values are displayed along the Y-axis. If you include two metrics, a line graph and an area graph are displayed together.

(No maximum number of attributes and metrics)

Interactive Bubble Graph No

- One attribute on the rows

To enable drilling on the bubble chart, add one additional attribute (a second attribute) to the right of the attribute in the rows. This attribute must a child attribute of the parent attribute already on the rows. For detailed information on this requirement, with an example, see Enabling drilling in an Interactive Bubble Graph.

To enable time series animation, add yet another attribute (a third attribute) to the left-most side of the rows. Then, in Flash Mode, right-click the widget and select Properties. Select the Enable time-series analysis check box. To enable the time series animation, you must have the second attribute for drilling, as well as the third attribute for time series animation.

- Three metrics on the columns. These metrics are displayed along the X-axis, Y-axis and Z-axis, in order from left to right (For example, the metric on the top of the columns is displayed on the X-axis). The Z-axis value determines the size of the bubble.

To display a different color bubble (series) for each attribute element on the bubble chart, add an additional attribute above the three metrics on the columns.

Interactive Stacked Graph No

- Two attributes, one on the rows and one on the columns.

The attribute placed in the widget template's columns will appear in the list of check boxes on the left side of the widget. For example, if you place a Category attribute in the columns and then switch to Flash Mode, the list of categories is displayed on the left as check boxes. You can select each check box to show or hide that specific data on the area graph.

Attributes placed on the columns must appear to the left of any metrics on the columns.

The attributes placed in the widget template's rows will appear on the X-axis at the bottom of the area graph in the widget. For example, if you place a Region attribute in the rows and then switch to Flash Mode, the regions are listed on the X-axis (the horizontal graph line) at the bottom of the area graph.

- Only one metric on the columns. The metric values are displayed on the Y-axis of the graph.

Metrics must appear below (or to the right of) any attributes on the columns.

(No maximum number of attributes. You can have only one metric on the widget template.)

Heat Map No

- One attribute on the rows.

The first attribute is used to create the large rectangles whose names are displayed in the widget.

If you add additional attributes to the widget template, all of the attributes will be displayed as separate rectangles within the larger rectangles.

Note: The widget can actually take any number of attributes. Attributes with a parent-child relationship work best, because they are ultimately nested within one another.

You can choose to create a dynamic heat map that an analyst can control using a selector. This type of heat map is considered dynamic because a user can use the selector to choose a different attribute element to view on the heat map. For steps to create a dynamic heat map, see Creating a dynamic Heat Map.

- Two metrics on the columns. If more than two metrics are placed on the widget template, they are displayed as options in the drop-down lists within the Heat Map.

The first metric on the columns determines the size of the small rectangles within the larger rectangles. Items with lower values are represented by smaller rectangles.

The second metric must be placed at the far right of the columns. It determines the color of each rectangle. The range of numbers within the metric is used to provide different shadings of color in the widget.
The largest metric values appear in the color used for the maximum values, while the smallest metric values appear in the color used for the minimum values.

Defining a Gauge widget
A Gauge widget is a simple status indicator that displays a needle that moves within a range of numbers displayed on its outside edges. For more information, see Understanding and working with widgets.

Once you place a widget in your document, you must place report objects such as attributes and metrics on the widget's template to define it as you might define any grid report template. Each widget requires a specific number, type, and arrangement of report objects. The following procedure describes how to define a Gauge widget once you have added it to your document.

To define a Gauge widget:

  1. Insert a Gauge widget into the document. For these steps, see Adding and defining widgets.
  2. Add objects to the widget template:
    From the Dataset Objects panel on the left, select attributes and metrics and drag them on top of the widget, as described below.
    • Place at least one attribute on the widget template's rows. Its elements are displayed in the selector.
    • Place one metric on the widget template's columns. This ensures that the needle in the gauge represents the metric values.
  3. Right-click the widget template, select View Mode, and then Graph. The widget template is displayed in a graph view.
  4. From the Format menu, select Graph. The Format: Graph dialog box is displayed.
  5. Click the General tab.
  6. From the Graph Type drop-down list, select Gauge.
  7. If desired, click the Options tab to set formatting options for the Gauge widget. For more information, see Formatting Gauge widgets.
  8. Click OK to apply the changes and close the dialog box.
  9. Insert a selector:
    Insert a selector next to the Gauge widget. This selector will allow you and other users to switch between the attribute elements you want to see indicated by the Gauge widget. Assign the attribute as the selector's source. For steps to insert a selector and select a source for it, see Adding selectors.
  10. Set the Gauge widget template as the target of the selector. To do so, right-click the selector and select Select Target. Then click the Gauge widget template to assign it as the selector's target.
  11. It is recommended you also drag the dataset report from the Dataset Objects panel and place it beneath the selector. This allows you to see the report's values as you select different attribute elements from the selector and see how they change the appearance of the Gauge widget.
  12. View the widget in Flash Mode:
    To view and interact with the widget, switch to Flash Mode by selecting Flash Mode from the View menu.
  13. By default, the numbers displayed on the Gauge widget are not limited to any specific range of values, such as 1 to 100. The numbers that are displayed on the widget are the same minimum and maximum Y1 values specified for the Gauge graph in Editable Mode. To specify a minimum and maximum value for the widget, do the following: From the View menu, select Editable Mode to return to Editable Mode. Click the Gauge widget template, and from the Format menu, select Graph. On the Axes tab, select the Minimum Value and Maximum Value check boxes and enter minimum and maximum Y1-axis values as necessary.

You can perform several tasks with the widget in Flash Mode. For example, you can:

Defining a Cylinder widget
A Cylinder widget is a simple status indicator that displays a vertical cylinder with fluid in it. For more information, see Understanding and working with widgets.

Once you place a widget in your document, you must place report objects such as attributes and metrics on the widget's template to define it as you might define any grid report template. Each widget requires a specific number, type, and arrangement of report objects. The following procedure describes how to define a Cylinder widget once you have added it to your document.

To define a Cylinder widget:

  1. Insert a Cylinder widget into the document. For these steps, see Adding and defining widgets.
  2. Add objects to the widget template:
    From the Dataset Objects panel on the left, select attributes and metrics and drag them on top of the widget, as described below.
    • Place at least one attribute on the widget template's rows. Its elements are displayed in the selector.
    • Place one metric on the widget template's columns. This ensures that the liquid level in the cylinder represents the metric values.
  3. Right-click the widget template, select View Mode, and then Graph. The widget template is displayed in a graph view.
  4. Insert a selector:
    Insert a selector next to the Cylinder widget. This selector will allow you and other users to switch between the attribute elements you want to see in represented in the Cylinder widget. Assign the attribute as the selector's source. For steps to insert a selector and choose a source for it, see Adding selectors.
  5. Set the Cylinder widget template as the target of the selector. To do so, right-click the selector and select Select Target. Then click the Cylinder widget template to assign it as the selector's target.
  6. It is recommended you also drag the dataset report from the Dataset Objects panel and place it beneath the selector. This allows you to see the report's values as you select different attribute elements from the selector and see how they change the appearance of the Cylinder widget.
  7. View the widget in Flash Mode:
    To view and interact with the widget, switch to Flash Mode by selecting Flash Mode from the View menu.
  8. By default, the values on the side of the Cylinder widget range from 1 to 100. If there are metric values on your report that are larger than 100, right-click the widget and select Properties to open the Cylinder Properties dialog box. In the Max value field, enter a number larger than the largest metric value on the report. For example, if the metric values on the report range from 60,000 to 1,000,000, enter a number like 1,100,000 to accommodate larger values in the data.

You can perform several tasks with the widget in Flash Mode. For example, you can:

Defining a Thermometer widget
A Thermometer widget is a simple status indicator that displays a thermometer set to a certain temperature level. For more information, see Understanding and working with widgets.

Once you place a widget in your document, you must place report objects such as attributes and metrics on it to define it as you might define any grid report template. Each widget requires a specific number, type, and arrangement of report objects. The following procedure describes how to define a Thermometer widget once you have added it to your document.

To define a Thermometer widget:

  1. Insert a Thermometer widget into the document. For these steps, see Adding and defining widgets.
  2. Add objects to the widget template:
    From the Dataset Objects panel on the left, select attributes and metrics and drag them on top of the widget, as described below.
    • Place at least one attribute on the widget template's rows. Its elements are displayed in the selector.
    • Place one metric on the widget template's columns. This ensures that the temperature level in the thermometer represents the metric values.
  3. Right-click the widget template, select View Mode, and then Graph. The widget template is displayed in a graph view.
  4. Insert a selector:
    Insert a selector next to the Thermometer widget. This selector will allow you and other users to switch between the attribute elements you want to see in represented in the Thermometer widget. Assign the attribute as the selector's source. For steps to insert a selector and select a source for it, see Adding selectors.
  5. Set the Thermometer widget template as the target of the selector. To do so, right-click the selector and select Select Target. Then, click the Thermometer widget template to assign it as the selector's target.
  6. It is recommended you also drag the dataset report from the Dataset Objects panel and place it beneath the selector. This allows you to see the report's values as you select different attribute elements from the selector and see how they change the appearance of the Thermometer widget.
  7. View the widget in Flash Mode:
    To view and interact with the widget, switch to Flash Mode by selecting Flash Mode from the View menu.
  8. By default, the values on the side of the Thermometer widget range from 1 to 100. If there are metric values on your report that are larger than 100, right-click the widget and select Properties to open the Thermometer Properties dialog box. In the Max value field, enter a number larger than the largest metric value on the report. For example, if the metric values on the report range from 60,000 to 1,000,000, enter a number like 1,100,000 to accommodate larger values in the data.

You can perform several tasks with the widget in Flash Mode. For example, you can:

Defining a Time Series Slider widget
A Time Series Slider widget is an area graph that allows a document analyst to choose which section of the graph to view at a time. For more information, see Understanding and working with widgets.

Once you place a widget in your document, you must place report objects such as attributes and metrics on it to define it as you might define any grid report template. Each widget requires a specific number, type, and arrangement of report objects. The following procedure describes how to define a Time Series Slider widget once you have added it to your document.

To define a Time Series Slider widget:

  1. Insert a Time Series Slider widget into the document. For these steps, see Adding and defining widgets.
  2. Add objects to the widget template:
    From the Dataset Objects panel on the left, select attributes and metrics and drag them on top of the widget, as described below.
    • Place at least one attribute on the rows. This attribute is typically time-based, such a Day or Quarter attribute, but it does necessarily have to be. Its elements are displayed on the X-axis.
    • Place one metric on the columns. The metric values are displayed on the graph report's Y-axis. If you include two metrics, a line graph and an area graph are displayed together.
  3. Insert a selector:
    Insert a selector next to the Time Series Slider widget. This selector will allow you and other users to switch between the attribute elements you want to see in represented in the Time Series Slider widget. Assign an attribute as the selector's source. For steps to insert a selector and choose a source for it, see Adding selectors.
  4. Set the Time Series Slider widget template as the target of the selector. To do so, right-click the selector and select Select Target. Then, click the Time Series Slider widget template to assign it as the selector's target.
  5. It is recommended you also drag the dataset report from the Dataset Objects panel and place it beneath the selector. This allows you to see the report's values as you select different attribute elements from the selector and see how they change the appearance of the Time Series Slider widget.
  6. View the widget in Flash Mode:
    To view and interact with the widget, switch to Flash Mode by selecting Flash Mode from the View menu.

You can perform several tasks with the widget in Flash Mode. For example, you can:

The following is an example of the widget template and report objects used to create a Time Series Slider widget.

When viewed in Flash Mode, the Time Series Slider widget is displayed.

Defining an Interactive Bubble Graph widget
An Interactive Bubble Graph widget is a conventional bubble plot that allows you to visualize the trends of three different metrics for a set of attribute elements. For more information, see Understanding and working with widgets.

Once you place a widget in your document, you must place report objects such as attributes and metrics on the widget's template to define it as you might define any grid report template. Each widget requires a specific number, type, and arrangement of report objects. The following procedure describes how to define an Interactive Bubble Graph widget once you have added it to your document.

To define an Interactive Bubble Graph widget:

  1. Insert an Interactive Bubble Graph widget into the document. For these steps, see Adding and defining widgets.
  2. Add objects to the widget template:
    From the Dataset Objects panel on the left, select attributes and metrics and drag them on top of the widget, as described below.
    • Place at least one attribute in the rows. To enable drilling on the bubble chart, add one additional attribute to the left of the attribute in the rows. For specific requirements to enable drilling, see Enabling drilling in an Interactive Bubble Graph widget.
    • To enable time series animation, add yet another attribute (a third attribute) on the left-most side of the rows.
    • Place at least three metrics on the columns. These metrics are displayed on the X-axis, Y-axis, and Z-axis, in order from left to right. To display a different color bubble (series) for each attribute element on the bubble chart, add an additional (a fourth) attribute above the three metrics on the columns.
  3. View the widget in Flash Mode:
    To view and interact with the widget, switch to Flash Mode by selecting Flash Mode from the View menu.
  4. If you added a second attribute (to enable drilling) or third attribute (to enable time series analysis) to the widget template, you must enable drilling and/or time series support in the widget. To do so, right-click the widget and select Properties. Select either or both the Enable drilling and Support time series check boxes, as necessary.

You can perform several tasks with the widget in Flash Mode. For example, you can:

The following is an example of the widget template and report objects used to create an Interactive Bubble Graph widget.

When viewed in Flash Mode, the Interactive Bubble Graph widget is displayed.

Enabling drilling in an Interactive Bubble Graph widget
When you add an Interactive Bubble Graph widget into a document, you can choose to enable drilling on the chart by adding one additional attribute (a second attribute) to the right of the attribute in the rows. This second attribute must be a child attribute of the parent attribute already on the rows. For example, in the image below, the parent attribute is Region and the Call Center Custom Group attribute is the child attribute.

To enable drilling on the chart, the child attribute must be structured in a specific way. This structure is best attained by using a custom group. For information on creating custom groups in Desktop, see the MicroStrategy Advanced Reporting Guide. The data in the grid for the child attribute must be displayed such that the total for the child attribute is in the top row of data, followed by the data for the child attribute. A custom group allows you to better ensure that this occurs. An example of this type of data in grid form is shown below. In the custom group, notice that the first element within the Northeast region is Northeast. This is followed by the two child attribute elements, Boston and New York.

In the metric data, the first row represents the total (Average for the first two metrics, Sum for the third) of the other two rows. This data structure is necessary for drilling to work properly. Non-summing functions, such as Average and Standard Deviation, should be used to calculate the first two metrics on the columns. This will make the range (scale) of values for the parent bubbles and the children bubbles similar.

Once the widget template contains the necessary objects, you must switch to Flash Mode and enable drilling within the widget. To do so, right-click the widget and select Properties. In the Properties dialog box that opens, select the Enable drilling check box.

To summarize, the widget template requirements for an Interactive Bubble Graph with drilling enabled are:

  • One attribute on the rows. This is the standard requirement for an Interactive Bubble Graph widget.
  • A second attribute must be placed to the right of the first attribute on the template rows. This attribute must be the child attribute, while the first attribute is the parent attribute. This second attribute must consist of a specific data structure so that the first grid row displays the total for the child attribute. This is best achieved by using a custom group, as described above.
  • Place at least three metrics on the columns. To display a different color bubble (series) for each attribute element on the bubble chart, place an additional attribute above the three metrics on the columns. The first two metrics should calculate using non-summing functions such as Average and Standard Deviation, as noted above.
  • Drilling must be enabled in the widget in Flash Mode. To enable drilling in the widget, right-click the Interactive Bubble Graph widget and select Properties. The Interactive Bubble Graph Properties dialog box is displayed. Select the Enable drilling check box and click OK.

To drill from one bubble down to the bubble's elements:

Click the bubble once to select it and again to drill on it. The elements are displayed in the bubble to which you drill.

Defining an Interactive Stacked Graph widget
An Interactive Stacked Graph widget is a combination of a check box list and area graph. For more information, see Understanding and working with widgets.

Once you place a widget in your document, you must place report objects such as attributes and metrics on the widget's template to define it as you might define any grid report template. Each widget requires a specific number, type, and arrangement of report objects. The following procedure describes how to define an Interactive Stacked Graph widget once you have added it to your document.

To define an Interactive Stacked Graph widget:

  1. Insert an Interactive Stacked Graph widget into the document. For these steps, see Adding and defining widgets.
  2. Add objects to the widget template:
    From the Dataset Objects panel on the left, select attributes and metrics and drag them on top of the widget, as described below.
    • Place at least two attributes, one on the rows and one on the columns.
      • The attribute placed in the widget template's columns will appear in the list of check boxes on the left side of the widget. For example, if you place a Category attribute in the columns and then switch to Flash Mode, the list of categories is displayed on the left as check boxes. You can select each check box to show or hide that specific data on the area graph. Attributes placed on the columns must appear to the left of any metrics on the columns.
      • The attributes placed in the widget template's rows will appear on the X-axis at the bottom of the area graph in the widget. For example, if you place a Region attribute in the rows and then switch to Flash Mode, the regions are listed on the X-axis (the horizontal graph line) at the bottom of the area graph.
    • Place at least one metric on the columns, below the attribute in the columns. In Flash Mode, the metric values are displayed along the Y-axis (the vertical graph line).
  3. View the widget in Flash Mode:
    To view and interact with the widget, switch to Flash Mode by selecting Flash Mode from the View menu.
  4. Do either of the following to interact with the widget:
    • Hold CTRL and select check boxes to view each attribute element in the stacked graph as pieces of the total. This allows you to compare the total (the largest area graph) with the individual items/objects (the smaller area graphs within the larger graph). You can see how much of the total one particular item takes up. (For example, if you have a list of regions in the check box list on the left, you can hold CTRL and click each check box to see a separate area graph for each region you select.)
    • Select or clear each check box to show or hide that attribute element's area graph on the right. If all of the check boxes are selected, the large area graph represents the total of all of the attribute elements.

You can perform several tasks with the widget in Flash Mode. For example, you can:

The following is an example of the widget template and report objects used to create an Interactive Stacked Graph widget.

When viewed in Flash Mode, the Interactive Stacked Graph widget is displayed.

Defining a Heat Map widget
A Heat Map widget is a combination of colored rectangles, each representing an attribute element, that allow you to quickly grasp the state and impact of a large number of variables at once. For more information, see Understanding and working with widgets.

Once you place a widget in your document, you must place report objects such as attributes and metrics on the widget's template to define it as you might define any grid report template. Each widget requires a specific number, type, and arrangement of report objects. The following procedure describes how to define a Heat Map widget once you have added it to your document.

To define a Heat Map widget:

  1. Insert a Heat Map widget into the document. For these steps, see Adding and defining widgets.
  2. Add objects to the widget template:
    From the Dataset Objects panel on the left, select attributes and metrics and drag them on top of the widget, as described below.
    • One attribute on the rows. If you add additional attributes to the widget template, all of the attributes will be displayed as separate rectangles in the heat map.

      You can also create a dynamic heat map which uses a selector. For these specific requirements, see Creating a dynamic Heat Map.

    • Place at least two metrics on the columns. If more than two metrics are placed on the widget template, they are ignored.
      • The first metric on the columns determines the size of each rectangle.
      • The second metric at the bottom of the columns must include values in the range of -1 to 1. This range is used to provide different shadings of color in the heat map widget.

  3. View the widget in Flash Mode:
    To view and interact with the widget, switch to Flash Mode by selecting Flash Mode from the View menu.
  4. You can enable a legend for the charts. Right-click the widget and select Properties. The Properties dialog box opens.
  5. Select the Show Legend check box and click OK. A legend is displayed near the widget. An example of a legend is shown below.

You can analyze and interact with the Heat Map widget in several ways in Flash Mode. For details, see Understanding and Working with Widgets: Heat Map.

You can perform several tasks with the widget in Flash Mode. For example, you can:

The following is an example of the widget template and report objects used to create a Heat Map widget.

When viewed in Flash Mode, the Heat Map widget is displayed.

Note: Some of the rectangles in the Heat Map widget are hidden from view.

Creating a dynamic Heat Map
A Heat Map widget is a combination of colored rectangles, each representing an attribute element, that allow you to quickly grasp the state and impact of a large number of variables at once. For more information, see Understanding and working with widgets.

When you use a Heat Map widget in a document, you can also add a selector to create a dynamic Heat Map. A selector provides options to a user; by selecting an option from the selector, he or she determines what data is displayed in the widget. The selector makes a heat map dynamic because a user can use the selector, such as a drop-down list, to select a different attribute element to be displayed by the heat map.

A standard Heat Map widget requires one attribute on its widget template rows and two metrics on its columns, as described in Defining a Heat Map widget. A dynamic Heat Map widget has the same requirements; however, you must perform a few additional steps to successfully create the widget, as described in the procedure below. An example of how to create a dynamic heat map follows the procedure.

To create a dynamic Heat Map:

  1. Insert a Heat Map widget into your document. For these steps, see Adding and defining widgets.
  2. Add at least one attribute to the widget template's rows and two metrics to the widget template's columns. For more details about this requirement and the purpose of these report objects, see Defining a Heat Map widget.
  3. Insert a selector, such as a Drop-down list, next to the widget. For these steps, see Adding selectors.
  4. Choose an attribute from the dataset and set this attribute (a different attribute that is not already on the widget template) as the Source of the selector. Do not include this attribute on the widget template itself. Although this second attribute is not included on the actual widget template, it will be used to populate the selector. This allows an analyst to switch between different attribute elements in the selector to view different information on the heat map.
  5. Set the widget template as the Target of the selector.

For example, a Grid/Graph is displayed as a Heat Map widget. This Grid/Graph has Category and Subcategory attributes on its rows, and one of the metrics on its columns is the Revenue metric. You want to use a selector to see heat maps for categories and subcategories in specific regions. Create a drop-down selector, setting the Region attribute as its source and the Grid/Graph as its target. Do not add the Region attribute to the Grid/Graph because then all regions will be displayed on the Heat Map. In Flash Mode, an analyst can use the selector to view category and subcategory data for different regions.

Turning a Grid/Graph into a widget
You can turn any Grid/Graph in your document into a widget that is displayed in Flash Mode. For example, you have a standard Grid/Graph in your document; a Region attribute is on the grid's rows and a Profit Margin metric is the grid's columns. In the Flash tab of the Properties dialog box, you can assign a type of widget, such as a Gauge widget, to this Grid/Graph. When you switch to Flash Mode, the Grid/Graph is no longer displayed as a standard Grid/Graph; it is displayed as a Gauge widget. This allows you to better visualize the metric data in the Grid/Graph.

Recall that each type of widget requires a certain number of attributes and metrics on its widget template. The same applies for the objects that appear on the Grid/Graph template. For example, a Gauge widget template must consist of one attribute on the rows and one metric on the columns. Therefore, any Grid/Graph you turn into a Gauge widget must also consist of one attribute on the rows and one metric on the columns. For information about these requirements, see Data requirements for widgets: Quick Reference Table.

Warning

The Grid/Graph you turn into a widget must follow the data and template requirements for that type of widget. For example, a Gauge widget requires one attribute on its widget template's rows and one attribute on the columns. Therefore, any Grid/Graph you to turn into a widget must have the same objects on its template. If it does not, the Grid/Graph is not displayed correctly as a widget in Flash Mode. For information about these requirements, see Data requirements for widgets: Quick Reference Table.

Prerequisites

You must have the necessary document designer privileges to work in Editable Mode or Design Mode and add a Grid/Graph to a document.

To turn a Grid/Graph into a widget:

  1. Insert a Grid/Graph into the document, if one is not already in the document. For these steps, see Adding Grid/Graphs.
  2. Right-click the Grid/Graph that you want to turn into a widget that is displayed in Flash Mode, and select Properties. The Properties dialog box is displayed.
  3. Select the Flash tab.
  4. From the Selected Widget drop-down list, select the type of widget you want to turn the Grid/Graph into.
  5. Click OK to apply the changes to the Grid/Graph.
  6. To view and interact with the widget, switch to Flash Mode by selecting Flash Mode from the View menu.

Determining how a widget is rendered in non-Flash modes
Since a widget can be displayed only in Flash Mode, you can determine how the widget appears in Interactive Mode and View Mode, as well as when exported to Excel and PDF.
A widget, in these circumstances, can be handled in the following ways.

Note: In Editable Mode and Design Mode, the Grid/Graph connected to the widget is displayed, regardless of the value of the Non-Flash rendering property.

  • Display the Grid/Graph to which the widget is attached.
  • Display an empty Grid/Graph placeholder. The container of the Grid/Graph is shown, with the border and background formatting. The following message is displayed within the container: "Flash Widgets cannot be rendered in this display." This message is displayed in View and Interactive Mode only.
  • Hide the Grid/Graph so that nothing is displayed.

If you choose to hide the Grid/Graph, you can display a message in place of the widget. To do this, add a text field behind the widget. This text field is displayed only when the widget is hidden. For information about adding text fields, see Adding and editing text and data; for information about displaying a text field behind a widget, see Ordering controls.

To determine how a widget is rendered in non-Flash views:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, view it in either Design Mode or Editable Mode.
  2. Right-click the Grid/Graph containing the widget and select Properties. The Properties dialog box is displayed.
  3. Select the Flash tab.
  4. From the Non-Flash Rendering drop-down list, choose one of the following:
    • Show Grid or Graph to display the Grid/Graph to which the widget is attached.
    • Show Placeholder to display an empty Grid/Graph placeholder instead of the widget.
    • Hide Grid or Graph to hide the widget and display nothing. See the information above about providing a text message to be displayed in its place.
  5. Click OK to apply the changes and close the dialog box.

Viewing data related to a widget: Using a widget as a selector
An attribute, metric, custom group, or consolidation on a Grid/Graph can be used as a selector, as explained in Enabling a Grid/Graph to control another Grid/Graph: Using Grid/Graphs as selectors. Since widgets are created using Grid/Graphs, you can also use report objects on the widget’s template as selectors. This allows a user in Interactive Mode or Flash Mode to select which elements to display in other Grid/Graphs and panel stacks in the document. In other words, the widget is used as a selector targeting a Grid/Graph or panel stack. The widget does not become a selector, but performs in a manner similar to a selector.

You can select report objects on a widget's template and turn these objects into selectors in the same way you can with a standard Grid/Graph. When working with the widget in Flash Mode, a user can then use different parts of the widget to display data in target Grid/Graphs and panel stacks in the document.

You can create selectors from the following widgets:

  • Interactive Bubble Graph
  • Interactive Stacked Graph
  • Time Series Slider
  • Heat Map

In Flash Mode, you can select elements from each of these widgets in a unique way. When you choose an element in the widget, data related to that element is displayed in all target Grid/Graphs and panel stacks. For example, clicking a bubble for the Southeast region in an Interactive Bubble Graph updates all target Grid/Graphs and panel stacks in the document with Southeast data. For information on how to use selectors in each widget in Flash Mode, see the following topics:

To create a selector from a widget, you first choose the target Grid/Graph and/or panel stack in either Design Mode or Editable Mode. However, for Interactive Stacked Graph widgets, you must then switch to Flash Mode to determine which part of the widget is used as a selector. This step is not necessary for Time Series Slider, Interactive Bubble Graph, or Heat Map widgets. For more information about specifying this in Flash Mode, refer to Using an Interactive Stacked Graph widget as a selector.

Prerequisites

This procedure assumes:

  • You have already created a widget that contains the report objects to use as selectors. For instructions, see Adding and defining widgets.
  • The widget is one of the following widget types:
    • Interactive Stacked Graph
    • Interactive Bubble
    • Time Series Slider widget
    • Heat Map
  • You have created the panel stack or Grid/Graph to use as the target. For instructions, see Adding a panel stack to a document or Adding Grid/Graphs.
  • The selector and target must have an attribute in common.

To use a widget template as a selector:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select either Design or Editable Mode.
  2. Do one of the following:
    • Right-click the attribute, custom group, or consolidation name (not an element) in the widget template to use as the selector, and choose Edit Selector. The Configure Selector dialog box opens.
    • Right-click the Metrics column in the widget template, and choose Edit Selector. The Configure Selector dialog box opens.
  3. Select the target Grid/Graph or panel stack in the list of available controls on the right, and click > to add it to the list of selected targets. You can select multiple targets. The attribute, metric, custom group, or consolidation you selected is the source, and the selected Grid/Graph is the target. The Action Type of the selector is set to Select Element.
  4. To ensure that you can select more than one element in the widget, select the Show option for All check box.
    Note the following:
    • You can select more than one element from the checklist in the Interactive Stacked Graph widget if the Show option for All check box is selected.
    • The Show option for All check box is not enabled for the Time Series Slider and Interactive Bubble Graph widgets because you cannot select more than one element from a Time Series Slider or Interactive Bubble Graph widget in Flash Mode.
    • The Show option for All check box is enabled for the Heat Map widget because you can select more than one element from the widget in Interactive Mode and Editable Mode, but not in Flash Mode.
  5. To ensure that the element displayed in the selector changes if an element is chosen in another selector, select Allow selector to be updated by other selectors.
  6. Click OK to apply the changes.

For the Interactive Stacked Graph widget, you must choose the parts of the widget to act as selectors. This step must be completed in Flash Mode. For more information and the steps, see Using an Interactive Stacked Graph widget as a selector.

Using a Time Series Slider widget as a selector
Report objects within a Time Series Slider widget can be enabled as selectors. For the steps, see Viewing data related to the widget: Using a widget as a selector.

After you enable one or more objects on the widget template as a selector, switch to Flash Mode to use the primary graph at the bottom of the widget as a selector. You can hover over and select an individual data point in the graph to display related data in target Grid/Graphs and panel stacks. If a data point can be used as a selector, the cursor changes to a hand pointer. For example, you can select the data point for January 2006 revenue. All data in target Grid/Graphs and panel stacks is updated after you select a data point.

Note: In Flash Mode, you can select the Change Selection on Mouse Over check box in the Properties dialog box to ensure that target Grid/Graphs and panel stacks are updated when you hover over a data point in the primary graph.

Using an Interactive Bubble Graph widget as a selector
Report objects within an Interactive Bubble Graph widget can be enabled as selectors. For the steps, see Viewing data related to the widget: Using a widget as a selector.

After you enable one or more objects on the widget template as a selector, switch to Flash Mode to use the widget to control targeted Grid/Graphs and panel stacks in the document. The following parts of an Interactive Bubble Graph widget can be used as selectors to display data in Grid/Graphs and panel stacks. When you hover the cursor over these selectable parts of the widget, the cursor turns into a hand, indicating that it can be selected.

Note: In Flash Mode, you can select the Change Selection on Mouse Over check box in the Selectors tab of the Properties dialog box to ensure that target Grid/Graphs and panel stacks are updated when you hover over a bubble or the legend.

  • Bubbles: The bubbles in the widget can be used as selectors if their corresponding attributes are enabled as selectors in the widget template. To use a bubble as a selector, click a bubble. For example, you can click a Northeast region bubble to display Northeast-related data in all target Grid/Graphs and panel stacks.
    • Double-click a bubble to drill down to the child elements of that bubble and to display data in the dashboard related to the bubble. To display data related to the drill-to element, click the child bubble. All target Grid/Graphs and panel stacks are updated with data related to your selection. For more information about drilling in an Interactive Bubble Graph widget, see Enabling drilling in an Interactive Bubble Graph widget.

  • Legend: The attribute elements in the legend can be used as selectors if the columns of the widget template contain an attribute is enabled as a selector. To use the legend as a selector, click an attribute element in the legend. Only one item in the legend can be selected at a time. For example, you can click the legend item for the Central region to display data for the Central region in all target Grid/Graphs and panel stacks.

For example, the Region attribute in the Interactive Bubble widget below is enabled as a selector. When you select a region bubble from the widget, the target graph on the right is updated with data related to that region.

Using an Interactive Stacked Graph widget as a selector
Report objects within an Interactive Stacked Graph widget can be enabled as selectors. For the steps, see Viewing data related to the widget: Using a widget as a selector.

After you enable one or more objects on the widget template as a selector, switch to Flash Mode to use the widget to control targeted Grid/Graphs and panel stacks in the document. You can determine which of the following is enabled as a selector in the widget.

  • Attribute elements in the legend on the left: The attribute elements in the checklist can be used as selectors if one or more of the attributes on the columns of the widget template are enabled as selectors. To use the attribute element names as selectors, click one of them. You can choose only one item from the list to update target panel stacks and Grid/Graphs. When multiple selections are made from the list, data related to only the last element selected is displayed in target panel stacks and Grid/Graphs.

  • Area graphs: The area graphs can be used as selectors if the attribute used to generate the graph series is enabled as a selector. To use one of the area graphs on the right as a selector, click the graph. The graph's appearance changes to indicate that it is selected. Only one graph can be selected at a time.

For example, the Region attribute in the Interactive Stacked Area widget below is enabled as a selector. When you select a region from the widget, the target grid on the right is updated with data related to that region.

To determine which part of an Interactive Stacked Graph widget is enabled as a selector:

  1. Open the document and, from the View menu, select Flash Mode.
  2. Right-click the widget and select Properties. The Properties dialog box opens.
  3. From the Selectable Area drop-down list, select Graph or Legend.
    • You can ensure that target Grid/Graphs and panel stacks are updated when you hover over one of these objects. To do so, select the Change Selection on Mouse Over check box.
  4. Click OK to apply the changes.

Using a Heat Map widget as a selector
Report objects within a Heat Map widget can be enabled as selectors. For the steps, see Viewing data related to the widget: Using a widget as a selector.

After you enable one or more objects on the widget template as a selector, switch to Flash Mode to use any related area headers or rectangles in the widget as selectors. You can hover over and select a header or rectangle in the widget to display related data in target Grid/Graphs and panel stacks. If a rectangle or header can be used as a selector, the cursor changes to a hand pointer. For example, if the Category attribute is enabled as a selector, you can use the Category header as a selector. If an additional attribute such as Region is also enabled as a selector, you can use individual rectangles as selectors. All data in target Grid/Graphs and panel stacks is updated after you select the header or rectangle.

Manipulating controls
Once you have added data and other controls to a document, you can
align, distribute, move, order, and size the controls to define how they appear on the PDF when the document is printed out. You can also use the Document Editor to do the following:

Selecting controls
You can select controls by simply clicking them in your document. However, when you have multiple controls in your document, it can be useful to select a control from the left-most drop-down list that appears on the Formatting toolbar. It lists the names of every control in the document, as well as icons to represent each type of control.

Selecting multiple controls
You can select multiple controls so you can manipulate them all at once, for example, aligning, distributing, sizing, and so on:

  1. Open the document and view it in either Design Mode or Editable Mode from the View menu.
  2. Do one of the following:
    • Hold down the CTRL key while you click each subsequent control after the first one.
    • Drag a selection box: Click in an empty area of a section. Drag a box that touches the controls to be selected, then release the mouse button. The box can span multiple document sections.

The selected controls display with some colored sizing handles.

Note: If you selected a control that you do not want, hold CTRL and click the control to deselect it.

Adding multiple controls
Using the Lock feature allows you to add multiple controls of the same type. For example, you can insert three text fields without needing to select the Text option three times.

  1. Open the document and view it in either Design Mode or Editable Mode from the View menu.
  2. Select the type of control (for example, Text, Image, and so on) to add, by clicking the icon in the toolbar, or by selecting the type from the Insert menu.
  3. Click the Lock icon  on the toolbar.
  4. Every time you click in the Layout area, a new control of the selected type is added.
  5. To turn off the locking feature, click Lock again on the toolbar.

Aligning controls
You can align multiple controls by doing the following:

  1. Open the document and view it in either Design Mode or Editable Mode from the View menu.
  2. Select more than one controls to be aligned.
  3. Right-click one of the controls and highlight Align.
  4. Select one of the following options:
    • Left: horizontally aligns all selected controls with the leftmost control.
    • Center: horizontally centers all selected controls.
    • Right: horizontally aligns all selected controls with the rightmost control.
    • Top: vertically aligns all selected controls with the topmost control.
    • Middle: vertically centers all selected controls.
    • Bottom: vertically aligns all selected controls with the lowest control.
    • To Grid: aligns the upper left corner of all selected controls to the closest grid point.

You can also access these ordering options from the Align and Order toolbar. To show the Align and Order toolbar, from the View menu, select Toolbars, and then Align and Order .

Distributing controls
If you have several controls that are not spaced very well, you can use the Document Editor to distribute them evenly:

  1. Open the document and view it in either Design Mode or Editable Mode from the View menu.
  2. Select at least three controls (see Selecting multiple controls), and right-click one of them.
  3. Select Align from the right-click menu.
  4. Select one of the following options:
    • Distribute Horizontally: evenly spaces the selected controls across the width of the page.
    • Distribute Vertically: evenly spaces the selected controls across the length of the section.

Moving controls
To move a control in a document:

  1. Open the document and view it in either Design Mode or Editable Mode from the View menu.
  2. Select a control and do one of the following:
    • Drag and drop the control to the new location.
    • Specify the new position for the control right-clicking the control and selecting Properties, or selecting Properties from the Format menu.
    • Select a control, hold down CTRL and tap the arrow keys to reposition it.

Ordering controls
Controls in a document can overlap. To avoid that, set the order of controls by doing the following:

  1. Open the document and view it in either Design Mode or Editable Mode from the View menu.
  2. Right-click a control, highlight Order, and select one of the options described below:
    • Send to Back: moves the control to the very back of the document.
    • Bring to Front: moves the control to the very front of the document.
    • Send Backward: when three or more controls overlap and you want to incrementally send one control back, but not all the way to the back.
    • Bring Forward: when three or more controls overlap and you want to incrementally bring one control forward, but not all the way to the front.

You can also access these ordering options from the Align and Order toolbar. To show the Align and Order toolbar, from the View menu, select Toolbars, and then Align and Order.

Sizing controls
Perform the steps below to size either a single control or multiple controls.

To size a single control:

  1. Open the document and view it in either Design Mode or Editable Mode from the View menu.
  2. Select a control and do one of the following:
    • Drag any of its sizing handles. Drop to its new size.
    • Hold down the SHIFT key while pressing the Up, Down, Left, or Right arrow keys.
    • Right-click the control and select Properties, or select Properties from the Format menu. Then define the size properties for the control in the Layout tab:
      • Width: sets the width of the control. It is not available for section headers/footers.
        • Fixed at: The width does not change from the set size. It is not available for sections, panel stacks, or selectors.
        • 100%: This sets the item's width to that of the section. This is used for lines and rectangles only. It is not available for sections, panel stacks, or selectors.
        • Fit to contents: The width expands to the width of the item. It is not available for sections, panel stacks, text fields, or selectors.
      • Height: sets the height of the control.
        • Fixed at: The height does not change from the set size.
        • 100%: This sets the item's height to that of the section. This is used for lines and rectangles only. It is not available for sections or panel stacks.
        • Fit to contents: The height expands to the height of the item. This is used for text fields and for Grid/Graphs displayed as grids. It only affects View Mode. It is not available for sections or panel stacks.
      • Length: determines if the length of a line is dynamic.
        • Fixed at: The length does not change from the set size.
        • 100%: This sets the item's length to that of the section. This is used for lines and rectangles only.

To size multiple controls:

  1. Open the document and view it in either Design Mode or Editable Mode from the View menu.
  2. Select more than one control.
  3. Right-click a control and highlight Size.
  4. Select one of the following options:
    • To Grid: changes the size of the selected controls to accommodate the size of the grid.
    • To Tallest: changes the height of the selected controls to that of the tallest one.
    • To Shortest: changes the height of the selected controls to that of the shortest one.
    • To Widest: changes the width of the selected controls to that of the widest one.
    • To Narrowest: changes the width of the selected controls to that of narrowest one.

You can also access these ordering options from the Align and Order toolbar. To show this toolbar, from the View menu, select Toolbars, and then Align and Order.

Snapping controls to the grid
You can align controls to grid points by using the Snap to grid feature. If this feature is enabled, the top left corner of the control moves from grid point to grid point when you move or resize the control. When you create a control, the top left corner of the control is aligned to a grid point. If you drag a control when creating it, all corners of the control are aligned to the grid. If Snap to grid is disabled, you can add, move, or resize controls anywhere in the Layout area. To temporarily disable this feature, press the CTRL key while moving or sizing controls.

To snap control to the grid, from the Format menu, select Snap to Grid.

Retrieving diagnostic information in Flash Mode for Technical Support
Before contacting MicroStrategy Technical Support, review the Troubleshooting common Flash Mode issues section.

When contacting MicroStrategy Technical Support about an issue related to Flash Mode, you may be asked to provide diagnostic information about Flash Mode. Work with Technical Support to retrieve this information from MicroStrategy Web.